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Neapolitan Translations: Boccaccio's "Andreuccio da Perugia" (Decameron II.5)

Neapolitan Translations: Boccaccio's "Andreuccio da Perugia" (Decameron II.5) Julie s inger Neapolitan Translations Boccaccio’s “Andreuccio da Perugia” (Decameron II.5) At the dawn of the fourteenth century, the French language and its regional vari- ants had been an established literary idiom for some three hundred years, whereas the youthful Italian vernacular literature, still more of a localized phenomenon, truly came into its own as a broader cultural movement only in the trecento (with its “tre corone” of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio). As Kevin Brownlee argues in “e Th Coni fl cted Genealogy of Cultural Authority,” “e Th fact of French hegemony [was] a cultural given in early fourteenth-century Italian literary contexts” (26): 8 in order to establish their own national literary tradition, Italian vernacular writers necessarily responded to the French language’s status as a dominant literary idiom. i Th s oe ft n contentious process of die ff rentiation is characterized by Brownlee as “genealogical /generational coni fl ct” (22). 6 One such coni fl ct of “native” and “for - eign,” of French and Italian, is staged in the e ftfi enth novella of Boccaccio’s De- cameron, a tale that constitutes not only a masterpiece of slapstick, but an under- mining—through translational transactions—of French cultural authority. e http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Neapolitan Translations: Boccaccio's "Andreuccio da Perugia" (Decameron II.5)

The Comparatist , Volume 31 – May 29, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Julie s inger Neapolitan Translations Boccaccio’s “Andreuccio da Perugia” (Decameron II.5) At the dawn of the fourteenth century, the French language and its regional vari- ants had been an established literary idiom for some three hundred years, whereas the youthful Italian vernacular literature, still more of a localized phenomenon, truly came into its own as a broader cultural movement only in the trecento (with its “tre corone” of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio). As Kevin Brownlee argues in “e Th Coni fl cted Genealogy of Cultural Authority,” “e Th fact of French hegemony [was] a cultural given in early fourteenth-century Italian literary contexts” (26): 8 in order to establish their own national literary tradition, Italian vernacular writers necessarily responded to the French language’s status as a dominant literary idiom. i Th s oe ft n contentious process of die ff rentiation is characterized by Brownlee as “genealogical /generational coni fl ct” (22). 6 One such coni fl ct of “native” and “for - eign,” of French and Italian, is staged in the e ftfi enth novella of Boccaccio’s De- cameron, a tale that constitutes not only a masterpiece of slapstick, but an under- mining—through translational transactions—of French cultural authority. e

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 29, 2007

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