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Naguib Mahfouz's Children of the Alley and the Coming Revolution

Naguib Mahfouz's Children of the Alley and the Coming Revolution NaTha Niel Gree NBer G Naguib Mahfouz’s Children of the Alley and the Coming Revolution iNTro Duc Tio N 11 m 20 arked the centennial of the birth of the Egyptian Nobel laureate Najīb Maḥfūẓ (Naguib Mahfouz). Celebrating in the shadow of the Arab Spring, it was a t fi ting coincidence for fans of the late great master, as Mahfouz was undoubtedly the most prolic c fi hronicler of social transformation in modern Egyptian history. Recognized more than any author in the Arab world, most of his thirty novels have been translated into English (and many other languages) and works like Bayn al- Qaṣrayn (16;95 Palace Walk ) and Zuqāq Mal-idaqq (15;49 Midaq Alley) have be- come staples of world literature classes. Despite this canonization, the controversy surrounding his first novel following the Free- O c ffi ers’ revolution of 12,95 Awlād Ḥāratinā (19; 95 Children of the Alley),1 remains as poignant as ever. 2 Banned by the government of Jamāl ‘Abd al- Nāṣir (Nasser) and finally republished in 2006, just months ae ft r the author’s death and Egypt’s first “open” parliamentary elections, key aspects of the novel appear prophetic in the wake of 25 January 211.0 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Naguib Mahfouz's Children of the Alley and the Coming Revolution

The Comparatist , Volume 37 – May 12, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

NaTha Niel Gree NBer G Naguib Mahfouz’s Children of the Alley and the Coming Revolution iNTro Duc Tio N 11 m 20 arked the centennial of the birth of the Egyptian Nobel laureate Najīb Maḥfūẓ (Naguib Mahfouz). Celebrating in the shadow of the Arab Spring, it was a t fi ting coincidence for fans of the late great master, as Mahfouz was undoubtedly the most prolic c fi hronicler of social transformation in modern Egyptian history. Recognized more than any author in the Arab world, most of his thirty novels have been translated into English (and many other languages) and works like Bayn al- Qaṣrayn (16;95 Palace Walk ) and Zuqāq Mal-idaqq (15;49 Midaq Alley) have be- come staples of world literature classes. Despite this canonization, the controversy surrounding his first novel following the Free- O c ffi ers’ revolution of 12,95 Awlād Ḥāratinā (19; 95 Children of the Alley),1 remains as poignant as ever. 2 Banned by the government of Jamāl ‘Abd al- Nāṣir (Nasser) and finally republished in 2006, just months ae ft r the author’s death and Egypt’s first “open” parliamentary elections, key aspects of the novel appear prophetic in the wake of 25 January 211.0

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 12, 2013

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