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Moving Toward a "No South": George Washington Cable's Global Vision in The Grandissimes

Moving Toward a "No South": George Washington Cable's Global Vision in The Grandissimes Moving Toward a “No South”: George Washington Cable’s Global Vision in The Grandissimes by Katharine A. Burnett In 1882, George Washington Cable gave the commencement address at the University of Mississippi. His speech, “Literature in the Southern States,” proclaims the opposite of what its title implies. Rather than outlining the condition of southern literature at the time, Cable decries sectionalist tendencies in literary production and argues bluntly, e Th re is a newly- coined name that most agreeably tickles the ear of the young citizen in our southern states, but which I would gladly see met with somewhat of disrelish: the New South. It is a term only fit to indicate a transitionary condition. What we want — w hat we ought to have in view — is the No South! Does the word sound like annihilation? It is the farthest from it. It is enlargement. It is growth. It is a higher life. (47) Instead of falling into the popular, sectional politics of the period post- Reconstruction, Cable wished for writers to reach beyond limitations of regional allegiance to address universal and global issues: “We [southern writers] shall be the proud disciples of every American alike who adds http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Moving Toward a "No South": George Washington Cable's Global Vision in The Grandissimes

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 45 (1) – Jul 19, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 The Southern Literary Journaland the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English and Comparative Literature.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Moving Toward a “No South”: George Washington Cable’s Global Vision in The Grandissimes by Katharine A. Burnett In 1882, George Washington Cable gave the commencement address at the University of Mississippi. His speech, “Literature in the Southern States,” proclaims the opposite of what its title implies. Rather than outlining the condition of southern literature at the time, Cable decries sectionalist tendencies in literary production and argues bluntly, e Th re is a newly- coined name that most agreeably tickles the ear of the young citizen in our southern states, but which I would gladly see met with somewhat of disrelish: the New South. It is a term only fit to indicate a transitionary condition. What we want — w hat we ought to have in view — is the No South! Does the word sound like annihilation? It is the farthest from it. It is enlargement. It is growth. It is a higher life. (47) Instead of falling into the popular, sectional politics of the period post- Reconstruction, Cable wished for writers to reach beyond limitations of regional allegiance to address universal and global issues: “We [southern writers] shall be the proud disciples of every American alike who adds

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 19, 2013

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