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Monsters in the Classroom: Essays on Teaching What Scares Us ed. by Adam Golub and Heather Richardson Hayton (review)

Monsters in the Classroom: Essays on Teaching What Scares Us ed. by Adam Golub and Heather... problem, as Eburne’s anecdote reveals; in fact, it is less the case that a gullible, anti- intellectual populace has embraced superstitious or irrational beliefs than that, in practice, the political sphere has reduced the ability of any “experts” to speak mean- ingfully or effectively in matters of policy. It is a troubling issue, but as Eburne notes, the answer to the problem of knowl- edge in contemporary society cannot possibly lie in knowing . H lee st ss resses, at the end of Outsider Theory but also throughout the entire text, that we “culture workers, intellectuals, scientists, critics, artists, journalists, [and] producers of knowledge” need to expand “our set of information about intellectual history and the life of ideas. [. . .] It is not enough to argue about whether or not facts exists and how they are constructed; the point is to account for the means by which facts and nonfacts alike circulate and take on meaning in a historical process” (347). Thus, in Outsider e Th ory , Eburne reveals the real intellectual poverty of debates couched in the lan- guage of truth and falsehood by showing how various systems of knowledge can emerge, develop, transform, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Monsters in the Classroom: Essays on Teaching What Scares Us ed. by Adam Golub and Heather Richardson Hayton (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 43 – Nov 15, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

problem, as Eburne’s anecdote reveals; in fact, it is less the case that a gullible, anti- intellectual populace has embraced superstitious or irrational beliefs than that, in practice, the political sphere has reduced the ability of any “experts” to speak mean- ingfully or effectively in matters of policy. It is a troubling issue, but as Eburne notes, the answer to the problem of knowl- edge in contemporary society cannot possibly lie in knowing . H lee st ss resses, at the end of Outsider Theory but also throughout the entire text, that we “culture workers, intellectuals, scientists, critics, artists, journalists, [and] producers of knowledge” need to expand “our set of information about intellectual history and the life of ideas. [. . .] It is not enough to argue about whether or not facts exists and how they are constructed; the point is to account for the means by which facts and nonfacts alike circulate and take on meaning in a historical process” (347). Thus, in Outsider e Th ory , Eburne reveals the real intellectual poverty of debates couched in the lan- guage of truth and falsehood by showing how various systems of knowledge can emerge, develop, transform, and

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 15, 2019

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