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Modernism, Metaphysics, and Sexuality (review)

Modernism, Metaphysics, and Sexuality (review) Reviews Debrah Raschke, Modernism, Metaphysics, and Sexuality Selinsgrove, PA: Susquehanna University Press, 2006, 20 p 4 p. As Debrah Raschke writes in Modernism, Metaphysics, and Sexual,i t “y e Th narra - tive of epistemological crisis that has marked so many modernist studies is pivotal to understanding modernism. . . . As many feminist critics have noted, however, it is a narrative with a slant. Its early renditions created a narrative in which gen- der issues and women writers were virtually absent” (10). To rectify this oversight, Raschke has brought together in a series of essays, culminating with her new book an “examination of modernism’s preoccupation with epistemology and the [more recent] studies of alternative modernisms that reveal the former narrative to be gendered” (11). Her purpose in conjoining these themes has been twofold: “to re - veal an alternative modernism within the dominant narrative, one that subverts the sex/gender system it seems to preserve,” (11) and to facilitate a critical encounter between literary texts and modernist theory, revealing the extent to which text and critical doctrine challenge each other. Modernism, Metaphysics, and Sexual io ty e ff rs an original rereading of modern - ist texts from a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Modernism, Metaphysics, and Sexuality (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 31 – May 29, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Reviews Debrah Raschke, Modernism, Metaphysics, and Sexuality Selinsgrove, PA: Susquehanna University Press, 2006, 20 p 4 p. As Debrah Raschke writes in Modernism, Metaphysics, and Sexual,i t “y e Th narra - tive of epistemological crisis that has marked so many modernist studies is pivotal to understanding modernism. . . . As many feminist critics have noted, however, it is a narrative with a slant. Its early renditions created a narrative in which gen- der issues and women writers were virtually absent” (10). To rectify this oversight, Raschke has brought together in a series of essays, culminating with her new book an “examination of modernism’s preoccupation with epistemology and the [more recent] studies of alternative modernisms that reveal the former narrative to be gendered” (11). Her purpose in conjoining these themes has been twofold: “to re - veal an alternative modernism within the dominant narrative, one that subverts the sex/gender system it seems to preserve,” (11) and to facilitate a critical encounter between literary texts and modernist theory, revealing the extent to which text and critical doctrine challenge each other. Modernism, Metaphysics, and Sexual io ty e ff rs an original rereading of modern - ist texts from a

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 29, 2007

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