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Marriage on the Border: Love, Mutuality, and Divorce in the Upper South during the Civil War by Allison Dorothy Fredette (review)

Marriage on the Border: Love, Mutuality, and Divorce in the Upper South during the Civil War by... asserts that the fact that some free people of color experienced these rights and privileges explains why some of them supported the Confederacy during the Civil War. The Thirteenth Amendment officially ended legal distinctions between enslaved people and free people of color; however, Milteer contends that free people of color continued to distinguish them- selves from the formerly enslaved socially and politically. North Carolina’s Free People of Color is a well-researched and well-writ- ten narrative suited for history lovers, scholars, and the graduate seminar. Moreover, Milteer provides an important corrective for scholars who have too often lumped the varied experiences of free people of color together and paid little attention to the rights that free people of color were able to retain. Yet Milteer does not explicitly explain that the racial category of free people of color was created and maintained by white slaveholding elites. Other scholars of African American history have examined how free people of color resisted racial categorization imposed by the state. Finally, this work would have benefited from some broad comparisons to the ante - bellum South at large, which would have answered the question I was left with. Were the experiences of free people http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Marriage on the Border: Love, Mutuality, and Divorce in the Upper South during the Civil War by Allison Dorothy Fredette (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 11 (3) – Sep 1, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

asserts that the fact that some free people of color experienced these rights and privileges explains why some of them supported the Confederacy during the Civil War. The Thirteenth Amendment officially ended legal distinctions between enslaved people and free people of color; however, Milteer contends that free people of color continued to distinguish them- selves from the formerly enslaved socially and politically. North Carolina’s Free People of Color is a well-researched and well-writ- ten narrative suited for history lovers, scholars, and the graduate seminar. Moreover, Milteer provides an important corrective for scholars who have too often lumped the varied experiences of free people of color together and paid little attention to the rights that free people of color were able to retain. Yet Milteer does not explicitly explain that the racial category of free people of color was created and maintained by white slaveholding elites. Other scholars of African American history have examined how free people of color resisted racial categorization imposed by the state. Finally, this work would have benefited from some broad comparisons to the ante - bellum South at large, which would have answered the question I was left with. Were the experiences of free people

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Sep 1, 2021

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