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Making the Past: The Politics of Southern Memory

Making the Past: The Politics of Southern Memory Making the Past: The Politics of Southern Memory by Lindsay Byron Mammy: A Century of Race, Gender, and Southern Memory. By Kimberly Wallace- Sanders. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 2008. xvii + 224 pp. $40.00 cloth, $29.95 paper. Remembering the Great Depression in the Rural South. By Kenneth J. Bindas. Gainesville: UP of Florida, 2007. 192 pp. $59.95 cloth, $29.95 paper. “There is no such thing as was — on ly is,” William Faulkner famously surmised in a 1956 interview with The Paris Review. The spirit of this Faulknerian sentiment permeates both Kimberly Wallace- Sanders’s Mammy: A Century of Race, Gender, and Southern Memory and Kenneth Bindas’s Remembering the Great Depression in the Rural South, as each text offers examinations of the past in the context of a present and continuous construction. The similarities, however, end there. In Mammy, Wallace- Sanders utilizes an integrated examination of litera- ture, material culture, and popular icons to deconstruct representations of the mammy figure from the 1820s through the 1930s in order to reveal what this stereotype says about the needs of the dominant class. From over five hundred interviews of a generation of rural southerners, Bindas composes a portrait in Remembering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Making the Past: The Politics of Southern Memory

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 42 (2) – Jul 4, 2010

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Making the Past: The Politics of Southern Memory by Lindsay Byron Mammy: A Century of Race, Gender, and Southern Memory. By Kimberly Wallace- Sanders. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 2008. xvii + 224 pp. $40.00 cloth, $29.95 paper. Remembering the Great Depression in the Rural South. By Kenneth J. Bindas. Gainesville: UP of Florida, 2007. 192 pp. $59.95 cloth, $29.95 paper. “There is no such thing as was — on ly is,” William Faulkner famously surmised in a 1956 interview with The Paris Review. The spirit of this Faulknerian sentiment permeates both Kimberly Wallace- Sanders’s Mammy: A Century of Race, Gender, and Southern Memory and Kenneth Bindas’s Remembering the Great Depression in the Rural South, as each text offers examinations of the past in the context of a present and continuous construction. The similarities, however, end there. In Mammy, Wallace- Sanders utilizes an integrated examination of litera- ture, material culture, and popular icons to deconstruct representations of the mammy figure from the 1820s through the 1930s in order to reveal what this stereotype says about the needs of the dominant class. From over five hundred interviews of a generation of rural southerners, Bindas composes a portrait in Remembering

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 4, 2010

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