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Magical Realism and the Great Goddess in Two Novels by Alejo Carpentier and Alice Walker

Magical Realism and the Great Goddess in Two Novels by Alejo Carpentier and Alice Walker Magical Realism and the Great Goddess in Two Novels by Alejo Carpentier and Alice Walker Oralia Preble-Niemi The Comparatist, Volume 16, May 1992, pp. 101-114 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.1992.0005 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/415068/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 11:12 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPARATIST MAGICAL REAUSM AND THE GREAT GODDESS IN TWO NOVELS BY ALEJO CARPENTER AND AUCE WALKER Oralia Preble-Niemi The presence of magical realism in Alejo Carpentier's novels, in- cluding The Kingdom of This World (El reino de este mundo), has al- ready been well established,1 and, although it is a quality heretofore considered exclusive to Latin American fiction, I propose that magical realism is present in Walker's The Temple of My Familiar. In this study, I will highlight its presence in Walker's novel and compare her use ofit with Carpentier's. The two authors use magical realism as the means to achieving radically different ends. While Carpentier employs it to maintain the patriarchal institutions of his novelistic society, Walker uses it to reconcile two ofher characters with the matriarchal ethos of their subculture from which they have been alienated. Ideally, a thumbnail definition ofthe term http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Magical Realism and the Great Goddess in Two Novels by Alejo Carpentier and Alice Walker

The Comparatist , Volume 16 – Oct 3, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Magical Realism and the Great Goddess in Two Novels by Alejo Carpentier and Alice Walker Oralia Preble-Niemi The Comparatist, Volume 16, May 1992, pp. 101-114 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.1992.0005 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/415068/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 11:12 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPARATIST MAGICAL REAUSM AND THE GREAT GODDESS IN TWO NOVELS BY ALEJO CARPENTER AND AUCE WALKER Oralia Preble-Niemi The presence of magical realism in Alejo Carpentier's novels, in- cluding The Kingdom of This World (El reino de este mundo), has al- ready been well established,1 and, although it is a quality heretofore considered exclusive to Latin American fiction, I propose that magical realism is present in Walker's The Temple of My Familiar. In this study, I will highlight its presence in Walker's novel and compare her use ofit with Carpentier's. The two authors use magical realism as the means to achieving radically different ends. While Carpentier employs it to maintain the patriarchal institutions of his novelistic society, Walker uses it to reconcile two ofher characters with the matriarchal ethos of their subculture from which they have been alienated. Ideally, a thumbnail definition ofthe term

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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