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Logics of Failed Revolt: French Theory after May '68 (review)

Logics of Failed Revolt: French Theory after May '68 (review) REVIEWS rative or a poem affects in the end the fate ofme critical interpretation as well. It all comes down to a new "prosopopoeia": do critics put things straight in tiieir reading, or do they rather, as in Kleist's lawless world, expose a "performative that does not perform"? For his part, it seems that Miller has very little to worry about. Unlike semiotics for instance, the deconstructive reading of Miller has not turned, at least for the time being, into a marginalized technique ofdie speech acts. Roland Barthes was one semiotician who managed to foresee the danger of an operational reading that was inclined to leave out die good habit of creative reading. Convincing at almost every level ofme "linguistic moment," Miller imagines his "topographical" inquiry to be doing the work performed by personification: to show that underneatii any narrative, there is a "voice" that calls the reader to restore its "otherness." To mention other examples from Topographies, the ontological and epistemological implications ofNietzsche's style in Thus Spoke Zarathustra prove how linguistic tropes point toward a foray into a textual or "fabricated" reality rather than an "objective" one. In another essay, answering critics who feel discomfort with Derrida's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Logics of Failed Revolt: French Theory after May '68 (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 21 (1) – Oct 3, 1997

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright © the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
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1559-0887
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Abstract

REVIEWS rative or a poem affects in the end the fate ofme critical interpretation as well. It all comes down to a new "prosopopoeia": do critics put things straight in tiieir reading, or do they rather, as in Kleist's lawless world, expose a "performative that does not perform"? For his part, it seems that Miller has very little to worry about. Unlike semiotics for instance, the deconstructive reading of Miller has not turned, at least for the time being, into a marginalized technique ofdie speech acts. Roland Barthes was one semiotician who managed to foresee the danger of an operational reading that was inclined to leave out die good habit of creative reading. Convincing at almost every level ofme "linguistic moment," Miller imagines his "topographical" inquiry to be doing the work performed by personification: to show that underneatii any narrative, there is a "voice" that calls the reader to restore its "otherness." To mention other examples from Topographies, the ontological and epistemological implications ofNietzsche's style in Thus Spoke Zarathustra prove how linguistic tropes point toward a foray into a textual or "fabricated" reality rather than an "objective" one. In another essay, answering critics who feel discomfort with Derrida's

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 1997

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