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Lacan and Fantasy Literature: Portents of Modernity in Late-Victorian and Edwardian Fiction by Josephine Sharoni (review)

Lacan and Fantasy Literature: Portents of Modernity in Late-Victorian and Edwardian Fiction by... Langlois disentangles the convoluted pronominal calibrations of “Company,” in which a third person “devisor” conjures a “voice” that subjects an impassive re- cipient to memories of uncertain provenance. “Beckett forecloses the possibility of absolute certainty that the voice that speaks, the hearer that hears, and the devisor devising it all for company are in fact perfectly coherent expressions of a single ontological subject who is ‘alone’ in the silence and the dark of Co” (20 mpa7). ny Langlois argues that Beckett obeys “an imperative to represent what is fundamen- tally, immanently destructive of writing’s normal protocols, or frames of represen- tation” (211–12). This approximates Lyotard’s postmodern sublime, in which the artefact acknowledges what exceeds the aesthetic in order to represent negatively its founding representational aporias. Langlois similarly reads Blanchot against Ba- diou to gain a just appraisal of the way passive subjectivities become accessible “through fragmentary forms of writing” (226), especially in the paratactic shards of “Ill Seen, Ill Said” and “Worstward Ho.” The passive and paralytic characters of the second trilogy invite one to accept “that writing will always, at its most com- passionate, be complicit in the interminable fragments of language through which figures suffering so radically http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Lacan and Fantasy Literature: Portents of Modernity in Late-Victorian and Edwardian Fiction by Josephine Sharoni (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 43 – Nov 15, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Langlois disentangles the convoluted pronominal calibrations of “Company,” in which a third person “devisor” conjures a “voice” that subjects an impassive re- cipient to memories of uncertain provenance. “Beckett forecloses the possibility of absolute certainty that the voice that speaks, the hearer that hears, and the devisor devising it all for company are in fact perfectly coherent expressions of a single ontological subject who is ‘alone’ in the silence and the dark of Co” (20 mpa7). ny Langlois argues that Beckett obeys “an imperative to represent what is fundamen- tally, immanently destructive of writing’s normal protocols, or frames of represen- tation” (211–12). This approximates Lyotard’s postmodern sublime, in which the artefact acknowledges what exceeds the aesthetic in order to represent negatively its founding representational aporias. Langlois similarly reads Blanchot against Ba- diou to gain a just appraisal of the way passive subjectivities become accessible “through fragmentary forms of writing” (226), especially in the paratactic shards of “Ill Seen, Ill Said” and “Worstward Ho.” The passive and paralytic characters of the second trilogy invite one to accept “that writing will always, at its most com- passionate, be complicit in the interminable fragments of language through which figures suffering so radically

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 15, 2019

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