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Kate Chopin and Anna Julia Cooper: Critiquing Kentucky and the South

Kate Chopin and Anna Julia Cooper: Critiquing Kentucky and the South Kate Chopin and Anna Julia Cooper: Critiquing Kentucky and the South by Roberta S. Maguire Kate Chopin has been difficult for scholars to fix as a southern writer, beyond an earlier view of her as an exceptional local colorist whose work — especially her second novel The Awakening— looked for- ward to the modernist literature produced by many southern writers in the twentieth century. Having stopped writing as the twentieth century was dawning, she could not qualify as a Southern Renascence writer, at least according to the paradigm directing southern literary studies that held sway into the 1980s. And she seemed not wholly to identify herself in her life or through her work as a southerner, as Anne Goodwyn Jones notes in her 1981 study, Tomorrow Is Another Day: The Woman Writer in the South.Yet, as Jones also observes, “the symbols [Chopin] chose to invest her subject with imaginative power come from her Southern experience” (149). Since Jones’ book was published, a number of scholars have also identified Chopin as being both a part of and apart from the South — with the apartness indicating not the kind of ambivalence about region born of an engagement with southern concerns http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Kate Chopin and Anna Julia Cooper: Critiquing Kentucky and the South

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 35 (1) – Mar 6, 2003

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Kate Chopin and Anna Julia Cooper: Critiquing Kentucky and the South by Roberta S. Maguire Kate Chopin has been difficult for scholars to fix as a southern writer, beyond an earlier view of her as an exceptional local colorist whose work — especially her second novel The Awakening— looked for- ward to the modernist literature produced by many southern writers in the twentieth century. Having stopped writing as the twentieth century was dawning, she could not qualify as a Southern Renascence writer, at least according to the paradigm directing southern literary studies that held sway into the 1980s. And she seemed not wholly to identify herself in her life or through her work as a southerner, as Anne Goodwyn Jones notes in her 1981 study, Tomorrow Is Another Day: The Woman Writer in the South.Yet, as Jones also observes, “the symbols [Chopin] chose to invest her subject with imaginative power come from her Southern experience” (149). Since Jones’ book was published, a number of scholars have also identified Chopin as being both a part of and apart from the South — with the apartness indicating not the kind of ambivalence about region born of an engagement with southern concerns

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 6, 2003

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