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Jung and the Jungians on Myth: An Introduction (review)

Jung and the Jungians on Myth: An Introduction (review) BOOK NOTES Since the ostensive moment, as Fry conceives it, inherently eschews meaning, he must, and does at numerous places throughout his text, perform ostensión rather than define it. Although free from meaning-dependence, the ostensive moment is both intentional (in the phenomenological sense, a consciousness ofsomething) and, in fact, preconceptual (11). Though part of a culture-specific artifact, it is not constructed; and, altiiough dialectically interconnected with reference and form, it resists being subsumed by history or structure (5-6). Further, ostensión is not to be aligned with the sublime (a potential misreading which Fry emphatically preempts in his introduction and subsequently in Chapter 7), epiphany (all of Part Two, and Chapter 5 specifically), or social or aestiietic indifference (Chapter 6). And when Fry writes elsewhere that the intentionality of ostensión involves an awareness of the unintended that is either expressed as such or provokes, as non-construction, that compensatory construction of intentional consciousness with which the notion of "hieropoetics" confuses it (29), comparatists familiar with Maurice Blanchot's work--whose essay, "Literature and me Right to Death," Fry aptly calls "Blanchot's defense of poetry" (8)--can begin to detect how central the movement of negativity is to Fry's argument. Phenomenology, as it is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Jung and the Jungians on Myth: An Introduction (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 21 (1) – Oct 3, 1997

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright © the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
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1559-0887
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Abstract

BOOK NOTES Since the ostensive moment, as Fry conceives it, inherently eschews meaning, he must, and does at numerous places throughout his text, perform ostensión rather than define it. Although free from meaning-dependence, the ostensive moment is both intentional (in the phenomenological sense, a consciousness ofsomething) and, in fact, preconceptual (11). Though part of a culture-specific artifact, it is not constructed; and, altiiough dialectically interconnected with reference and form, it resists being subsumed by history or structure (5-6). Further, ostensión is not to be aligned with the sublime (a potential misreading which Fry emphatically preempts in his introduction and subsequently in Chapter 7), epiphany (all of Part Two, and Chapter 5 specifically), or social or aestiietic indifference (Chapter 6). And when Fry writes elsewhere that the intentionality of ostensión involves an awareness of the unintended that is either expressed as such or provokes, as non-construction, that compensatory construction of intentional consciousness with which the notion of "hieropoetics" confuses it (29), comparatists familiar with Maurice Blanchot's work--whose essay, "Literature and me Right to Death," Fry aptly calls "Blanchot's defense of poetry" (8)--can begin to detect how central the movement of negativity is to Fry's argument. Phenomenology, as it is

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 1997

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