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John Phillip Santos and the Creation of Sacred Memories

John Phillip Santos and the Creation of Sacred Memories John Phillip Santos and the Creation of Sacred Memories by Elizabeth Hayes Turner Historians of the South have ignored the contributions of Mexicans, Cubans, and Latin Americans to the development of southern history and southern autobiography for too long. Mexican-Americans living in Texas comprise a signifi cant percentage of the population of that state, so much so that candidates for governor must speak Spanish in their appeal to voters. Although historians of the South only reluc- tantly think of Texas as “southern,” in fact, the Lone Star State, after a short time as an independent republic, entered the Union as a slave state and joined the Confederacy. That Texas is the only southern state with an international border makes it unique. That Native Americans, Span- ish, and Mexicans settled it before ambitious Americans seized it puts it in a category akin to Louisiana. Its history, therefore, is both similar to that of other Deep South states and yet admittedly different. Just how similar and also how different can be seen in John Phillip Santos’s Places Left Unfi nished at the Time of Creation, an autobiographical memoir, the tale of a family and its spiritual journey across cultures and borders, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

John Phillip Santos and the Creation of Sacred Memories

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 36 (2) – May 19, 2004

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

John Phillip Santos and the Creation of Sacred Memories by Elizabeth Hayes Turner Historians of the South have ignored the contributions of Mexicans, Cubans, and Latin Americans to the development of southern history and southern autobiography for too long. Mexican-Americans living in Texas comprise a signifi cant percentage of the population of that state, so much so that candidates for governor must speak Spanish in their appeal to voters. Although historians of the South only reluc- tantly think of Texas as “southern,” in fact, the Lone Star State, after a short time as an independent republic, entered the Union as a slave state and joined the Confederacy. That Texas is the only southern state with an international border makes it unique. That Native Americans, Span- ish, and Mexicans settled it before ambitious Americans seized it puts it in a category akin to Louisiana. Its history, therefore, is both similar to that of other Deep South states and yet admittedly different. Just how similar and also how different can be seen in John Phillip Santos’s Places Left Unfi nished at the Time of Creation, an autobiographical memoir, the tale of a family and its spiritual journey across cultures and borders,

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 19, 2004

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