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Japanese Encounters with Latin America and Iberian Catholicism (1549–1973): Some Thoughts on Language, Imperialism, Identity Formation, and Comparative Research

Japanese Encounters with Latin America and Iberian Catholicism (1549–1973): Some Thoughts on... inaga s hige Mi Japanese Encounters with Latin America and Iberian Catholicism (1549–1793) Some o Th ughts on Language, Imperialism, Identity Formation, and Comparative Research Prolo gue Almost one century ae ft r Cortes had conquered Nuova Espana in 59,11 the Japa- nese delegation on board the San Juan Baptista docked in Acapulco on January 28, 1614. Consisting of more than 100 Japanese members, this delegation was lead by Hasekura Rokuzaemon Tsunenaga (1571–122), 6 a vassal of the Lord Date Masamune (17–1 65 6). 36 e Th ship had set sail on October 28, 3 161 from the port of Tsukinoura and took nearly three months to cross the Pacic fi Ocean. On board was Luis Sotelo (14–1 57 24), 6 a Franciscan priest from Seville, who had accompanied the delegation. Upon his return to Europe, Sotelo dictated his experiences to an Italian archivist, Scipione Amati, who compiled the document Historia del Regno de Voxu in 15.116 In this history, Luis Sotelo triumphantly reported that seventy-eight Japanese were baptized in Mexico City, although the extant church records, as noted by Van C. Gessel,2 make no mention of such event. It was also reported that a group of twenty or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Japanese Encounters with Latin America and Iberian Catholicism (1549–1973): Some Thoughts on Language, Imperialism, Identity Formation, and Comparative Research

The Comparatist , Volume 32 – May 24, 2008

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

inaga s hige Mi Japanese Encounters with Latin America and Iberian Catholicism (1549–1793) Some o Th ughts on Language, Imperialism, Identity Formation, and Comparative Research Prolo gue Almost one century ae ft r Cortes had conquered Nuova Espana in 59,11 the Japa- nese delegation on board the San Juan Baptista docked in Acapulco on January 28, 1614. Consisting of more than 100 Japanese members, this delegation was lead by Hasekura Rokuzaemon Tsunenaga (1571–122), 6 a vassal of the Lord Date Masamune (17–1 65 6). 36 e Th ship had set sail on October 28, 3 161 from the port of Tsukinoura and took nearly three months to cross the Pacic fi Ocean. On board was Luis Sotelo (14–1 57 24), 6 a Franciscan priest from Seville, who had accompanied the delegation. Upon his return to Europe, Sotelo dictated his experiences to an Italian archivist, Scipione Amati, who compiled the document Historia del Regno de Voxu in 15.116 In this history, Luis Sotelo triumphantly reported that seventy-eight Japanese were baptized in Mexico City, although the extant church records, as noted by Van C. Gessel,2 make no mention of such event. It was also reported that a group of twenty or

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 24, 2008

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