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Introduction: Collecting and/as Cultural Transformation

Introduction: Collecting and/as Cultural Transformation Introduction: Collecting and/as Cultural Transformation e Th three comparative and interdisciplinary essays in this section treat collecting in the historical context of imperialism and range over the geographical spaces of France, North and South America, New Caledonia, and Japan. Shorter papers on which the essays are based were presented in a three-day panel organized and chaired by the Guest Editors entitled “Collecting Actual and Metaphorical,” the idea for which originated with Helen Asquine Fazio, for the annual conference of the American Comparative Literature Association. We are grateful to the Editor for extending us the opportunity to explore the notion of collecting in the context of this journal. Colle Cting as the aPPro Priation o F iDentities Material collecting, or the systematic accumulation of material objects by indi- vidual and museum collectors, has been widely theorized from the 980s 1 by his- torians, art historians, anthropologists, sociologists, psychologists, and literary and cultural critics. Although the Guest Editors’ approach to collecting in the following essays builds on scholarship that views material objects as having a simple ma- terial existence, it extends that scholarship to consider collected objects as part of a broader symbolic system. Following Susan M. Pearce, we consider collecting http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Introduction: Collecting and/as Cultural Transformation

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Introduction: Collecting and/as Cultural Transformation e Th three comparative and interdisciplinary essays in this section treat collecting in the historical context of imperialism and range over the geographical spaces of France, North and South America, New Caledonia, and Japan. Shorter papers on which the essays are based were presented in a three-day panel organized and chaired by the Guest Editors entitled “Collecting Actual and Metaphorical,” the idea for which originated with Helen Asquine Fazio, for the annual conference of the American Comparative Literature Association. We are grateful to the Editor for extending us the opportunity to explore the notion of collecting in the context of this journal. Colle Cting as the aPPro Priation o F iDentities Material collecting, or the systematic accumulation of material objects by indi- vidual and museum collectors, has been widely theorized from the 980s 1 by his- torians, art historians, anthropologists, sociologists, psychologists, and literary and cultural critics. Although the Guest Editors’ approach to collecting in the following essays builds on scholarship that views material objects as having a simple ma- terial existence, it extends that scholarship to consider collected objects as part of a broader symbolic system. Following Susan M. Pearce, we consider collecting

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 24, 2008

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