Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“I have put all I possess at the disposal of the people’s struggle”: Pablo Neruda as Collector, Translator, and Poet

“I have put all I possess at the disposal of the people’s struggle”: Pablo Neruda as... k elly a ustin “I have put all I possess at the disposal of the people’s struggle” Pablo Neruda as Collector, Translator, and Poet In “Yo, el malacólogo” [I, the Malacologist]—a part of Pablo Neruda’s memoirs, Cone fi so que he vivid,o n fi ished shortly before his death in September 793— 1 Neruda recounts the day he decided to donate his seashell collection to his alma mater. With over 5,000 1 shells overo fl wing from the bookshelves and falling from tables and chairs, as well as enough books about seashells to fill his library, he boxed up his already famous collection and sent it to the University of Chile. He thought he had sealed its fate: “Como buena institución sudamericana, mi universidad los recibió con loores y discursos y los sepultó en un sótano” (228) [Like a good South American institution, my university received my collection with speeches and fan- fare and buried it in a basement].1 Neruda saw his self as multiple, split as an au- thor, collector—malacologist and bibliophile—as well as donor; simultaneously a man of public and private pursuits. Indeed, at a crucial turning point in his life, Neruda declared that he planned to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

“I have put all I possess at the disposal of the people’s struggle”: Pablo Neruda as Collector, Translator, and Poet

The Comparatist , Volume 32 – May 24, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/i-have-put-all-i-possess-at-the-disposal-of-the-people-s-struggle-0AoQHXs1FE
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

k elly a ustin “I have put all I possess at the disposal of the people’s struggle” Pablo Neruda as Collector, Translator, and Poet In “Yo, el malacólogo” [I, the Malacologist]—a part of Pablo Neruda’s memoirs, Cone fi so que he vivid,o n fi ished shortly before his death in September 793— 1 Neruda recounts the day he decided to donate his seashell collection to his alma mater. With over 5,000 1 shells overo fl wing from the bookshelves and falling from tables and chairs, as well as enough books about seashells to fill his library, he boxed up his already famous collection and sent it to the University of Chile. He thought he had sealed its fate: “Como buena institución sudamericana, mi universidad los recibió con loores y discursos y los sepultó en un sótano” (228) [Like a good South American institution, my university received my collection with speeches and fan- fare and buried it in a basement].1 Neruda saw his self as multiple, split as an au- thor, collector—malacologist and bibliophile—as well as donor; simultaneously a man of public and private pursuits. Indeed, at a crucial turning point in his life, Neruda declared that he planned to

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 24, 2008

There are no references for this article.