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Hurston and Welty, Janie and Livvie

Hurston and Welty, Janie and Livvie Hurston and Welty, Janie and Livvie by Carol S. Manning Though they were born only about ten years apart and both grew up in the South, Zora Neale Hurston and Eudora Welty could hardly have lived more different lives. Hurston was motherless from the age of eight and had a troubled relationship with her father, whereas Welty was raised by two loving, sheltering, supportive parents. Hurston left home for good when she was about fourteen, supporting herself through a variety of jobs in Washington, D.C., New York, and several other cities. Welty, on the other hand, lived most of her life in the family home in Jackson, Mississippi. Hurston became known as a flamboyant and sometimes raunchy extrovert, whereas Welty was a furiously private individual invariably described by interviewers as a gracious, self-effacing southern lady. Hurston died in poverty and obscurity at age sixty, whereas Welty was mourned around the world when she died at age ninety-two in 2001. Yet different as their lives were, Hurston and Welty exhibit remarkable similarities as writers. A hint of the similarities appears in the similar criticism that their works have sometimes evoked. Both authors have, on more than one occasion, been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Hurston and Welty, Janie and Livvie

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 34 (2) – Jan 6, 2002

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hurston and Welty, Janie and Livvie by Carol S. Manning Though they were born only about ten years apart and both grew up in the South, Zora Neale Hurston and Eudora Welty could hardly have lived more different lives. Hurston was motherless from the age of eight and had a troubled relationship with her father, whereas Welty was raised by two loving, sheltering, supportive parents. Hurston left home for good when she was about fourteen, supporting herself through a variety of jobs in Washington, D.C., New York, and several other cities. Welty, on the other hand, lived most of her life in the family home in Jackson, Mississippi. Hurston became known as a flamboyant and sometimes raunchy extrovert, whereas Welty was a furiously private individual invariably described by interviewers as a gracious, self-effacing southern lady. Hurston died in poverty and obscurity at age sixty, whereas Welty was mourned around the world when she died at age ninety-two in 2001. Yet different as their lives were, Hurston and Welty exhibit remarkable similarities as writers. A hint of the similarities appears in the similar criticism that their works have sometimes evoked. Both authors have, on more than one occasion, been

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 6, 2002

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