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"Honey, Yer Ain't Harf as Smart as Yer Thinks Yer Is!": Race and Humor in Sherwood Bonner's Short Fiction

"Honey, Yer Ain't Harf as Smart as Yer Thinks Yer Is!": Race and Humor in Sherwood Bonner's Short... "Honey, Yer Ain't Harf as Smart as Yer Thinks Yer Is!": Race and Humor in Sherwood Bonner's Short Fiction by Kathryn B. McKee In 1892, professor and literary critic John Bell Henneman addressed the Virginia Literary Society of the State Female Normal School of Farmville, Virginia. Henneman would go on to some academic prominence, helping to edit in the early years of the twentieth-century, for example, the multivolume series, The South in the Building of the Nation (1909 ­1913) and overseeing for a time the publication of the Sewanee Review. But in 1892 he was a professor at neighboring Hampden-Sydney College, who took for his lecture's title " The Nineteenth Century Woman in Literature." His subject matter was a natural choice given his audience, he explains, and given the fact that women are actually at the root of many of history's turning points: man's loss of innocence in the Garden of Eden, the outbreak of the Greek and Trojan War, the dissolution of Antony's empire. Now, in this "period of the emancipation of women" (3), Henneman professes, women are still busy, "engaged in coquetting with, and in wooing, and in many instances in successfully capturing every employment, every http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

"Honey, Yer Ain't Harf as Smart as Yer Thinks Yer Is!": Race and Humor in Sherwood Bonner's Short Fiction

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 35 (1) – Jun 3, 2002

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

"Honey, Yer Ain't Harf as Smart as Yer Thinks Yer Is!": Race and Humor in Sherwood Bonner's Short Fiction by Kathryn B. McKee In 1892, professor and literary critic John Bell Henneman addressed the Virginia Literary Society of the State Female Normal School of Farmville, Virginia. Henneman would go on to some academic prominence, helping to edit in the early years of the twentieth-century, for example, the multivolume series, The South in the Building of the Nation (1909 ­1913) and overseeing for a time the publication of the Sewanee Review. But in 1892 he was a professor at neighboring Hampden-Sydney College, who took for his lecture's title " The Nineteenth Century Woman in Literature." His subject matter was a natural choice given his audience, he explains, and given the fact that women are actually at the root of many of history's turning points: man's loss of innocence in the Garden of Eden, the outbreak of the Greek and Trojan War, the dissolution of Antony's empire. Now, in this "period of the emancipation of women" (3), Henneman professes, women are still busy, "engaged in coquetting with, and in wooing, and in many instances in successfully capturing every employment, every

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 3, 2002

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