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Holding Pattern

Holding Pattern e dit or’s n o te h olding Pattern Washington, D.C. January 21, 2017. Toni Morrison once wrote, “there were no marigolds in the spring of 1941” (The Bluest Eye, 1). Her object in that book was the failure of com - munity; its specific iteration was in blackness, but her call was for us to take stock. Her purpose perhaps, was to map for us all the ways in which our heads incline toward looking away rather than looking at. In the wake of November’s 2016 election, we paid dearly for our look- ing away, for our surrender to appeasing nomenclatures for quotidian problems. Winter barely touc hed us, her repudiation complete and frost- less. Spring came to us, but briefly and with it apocalyptic floodi ng—ris- ing waters all around. Water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink. Maybe history will remember this April as indeed one of the cruelest months in our nation’s democracy. th On January 20 , we inaugurated a president with clear ties to white supremacy and whose campaign, much like that of other international 1 candidates in this fiscal year’s cycle of presidenti al elections, traffic ked in anti-Musli m, -immigrant, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

e dit or’s n o te h olding Pattern Washington, D.C. January 21, 2017. Toni Morrison once wrote, “there were no marigolds in the spring of 1941” (The Bluest Eye, 1). Her object in that book was the failure of com - munity; its specific iteration was in blackness, but her call was for us to take stock. Her purpose perhaps, was to map for us all the ways in which our heads incline toward looking away rather than looking at. In the wake of November’s 2016 election, we paid dearly for our look- ing away, for our surrender to appeasing nomenclatures for quotidian problems. Winter barely touc hed us, her repudiation complete and frost- less. Spring came to us, but briefly and with it apocalyptic floodi ng—ris- ing waters all around. Water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink. Maybe history will remember this April as indeed one of the cruelest months in our nation’s democracy. th On January 20 , we inaugurated a president with clear ties to white supremacy and whose campaign, much like that of other international 1 candidates in this fiscal year’s cycle of presidenti al elections, traffic ked in anti-Musli m, -immigrant,

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 15, 2017

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