Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Hellhound on His Trail: Faulknerian Blood-guilt and the Traumatized Form of Lewis Nordan’s Wolf Whistle

Hellhound on His Trail: Faulknerian Blood-guilt and the Traumatized Form of Lewis Nordan’s Wolf... Hellhound on His Trail: Faulknerian Blood-guilt and By Ted Atkinson For writers who hail from the U.S. South, especially from Mississippi, confronting the legacy of William Faulkner can be daunting. Lewis Nordan, a writer born and reared in the Mississippi Delta, describes his version of the dilemma: "The first thing I did as a writer was to imitate Faulkner without having any strong idea of what he was really doing." Nordan adds that, "as I didn't have a grasp on what he was doing, it prevented me from getting to what I really wanted to do." For Nordan, Faulkner's influence functioned as a potentially debilitating force that severely compromised the development of his artistic identity. Not surprisingly, then, Nordan declares with emphatic frustration that "when I'm compared with Faulkner . . . it drives me nuts" (qtd in Arbeit 633). In spite of Nordan's consternation, examining his work in the context of Faulkner's legacy is a worthy endeavor, though not merely for the purpose of demonstrating the anxiety of influence by casting Nordan as ephebe opposite Faulkner as grand literary Master, a tendency that Michael Kreyling defines as pervasive in southern studies (128). Indeed, the practice of comparing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Hellhound on His Trail: Faulknerian Blood-guilt and the Traumatized Form of Lewis Nordan’s Wolf Whistle

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 44 (1) – Feb 17, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/hellhound-on-his-trail-faulknerian-blood-guilt-and-the-traumatized-D0BOtiKT8T
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English .
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hellhound on His Trail: Faulknerian Blood-guilt and By Ted Atkinson For writers who hail from the U.S. South, especially from Mississippi, confronting the legacy of William Faulkner can be daunting. Lewis Nordan, a writer born and reared in the Mississippi Delta, describes his version of the dilemma: "The first thing I did as a writer was to imitate Faulkner without having any strong idea of what he was really doing." Nordan adds that, "as I didn't have a grasp on what he was doing, it prevented me from getting to what I really wanted to do." For Nordan, Faulkner's influence functioned as a potentially debilitating force that severely compromised the development of his artistic identity. Not surprisingly, then, Nordan declares with emphatic frustration that "when I'm compared with Faulkner . . . it drives me nuts" (qtd in Arbeit 633). In spite of Nordan's consternation, examining his work in the context of Faulkner's legacy is a worthy endeavor, though not merely for the purpose of demonstrating the anxiety of influence by casting Nordan as ephebe opposite Faulkner as grand literary Master, a tendency that Michael Kreyling defines as pervasive in southern studies (128). Indeed, the practice of comparing

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 17, 2011

There are no references for this article.