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Grounding Southern Ecocriticism

Grounding Southern Ecocriticism Grounding Southern Ecocriticism by Bart H. Welling Clear- Cutting Eden: Ecology and the Pastoral in Southern Literature. By Christopher Rieger. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P, 2009. 202 pp. $39.75 cloth. Grounded Globalism: How the U.S. South Embraces the World. By James L. Peacock. Athens: U of Georgia P, 2010. 328 pp. $22.95 paper. What might the future of southern ecocriticism look like? Al- though neither of them tackles this question directly, and one of them doesn’t bill itself as a work of ecocriticism at all, two studies from the last few years — or, rather, the unacknowledged intersections, gaps, and fric- tions between the two — suggest that a variety of ecocriticism grounded in the literatures, cultures, and places of the U.S. South has some vi- brant years ahead of it. First, though, it is worth asking where Christo- pher Rieger and James L. Peacock’s books achieve, and where they stop short of achieving, this kind of grounding. As a clearly written and carefully researched work of (mostly) second- wave ecocriticism, Rieger’s Clear- Cutting Eden lays a solid foundation for future ecocritical approaches to southern authors, particularly the main subjects of the study: Erskine Caldwell, Marjorie Kinnan Rawl- ings, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Grounding Southern Ecocriticism

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 45 (1) – Jul 19, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 The Southern Literary Journaland the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English and Comparative Literature.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Grounding Southern Ecocriticism by Bart H. Welling Clear- Cutting Eden: Ecology and the Pastoral in Southern Literature. By Christopher Rieger. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P, 2009. 202 pp. $39.75 cloth. Grounded Globalism: How the U.S. South Embraces the World. By James L. Peacock. Athens: U of Georgia P, 2010. 328 pp. $22.95 paper. What might the future of southern ecocriticism look like? Al- though neither of them tackles this question directly, and one of them doesn’t bill itself as a work of ecocriticism at all, two studies from the last few years — or, rather, the unacknowledged intersections, gaps, and fric- tions between the two — suggest that a variety of ecocriticism grounded in the literatures, cultures, and places of the U.S. South has some vi- brant years ahead of it. First, though, it is worth asking where Christo- pher Rieger and James L. Peacock’s books achieve, and where they stop short of achieving, this kind of grounding. As a clearly written and carefully researched work of (mostly) second- wave ecocriticism, Rieger’s Clear- Cutting Eden lays a solid foundation for future ecocritical approaches to southern authors, particularly the main subjects of the study: Erskine Caldwell, Marjorie Kinnan Rawl- ings,

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 19, 2013

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