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Grounding Southern Ecocriticism

Grounding Southern Ecocriticism Grounding Southern Ecocriticism by Bart H. Welling Clear- Cutting Eden: Ecology and the Pastoral in Southern Literature. By Christopher Rieger. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P, 2009. 202 pp. $39.75 cloth. Grounded Globalism: How the U.S. South Embraces the World. By James L. Peacock. Athens: U of Georgia P, 2010. 328 pp. $22.95 paper. What might the future of southern ecocriticism look like? Although neither of them tackles this question directly, and one of them doesn't bill itself as a work of ecocriticism at all, two studies from the last few years -- or, rather, the unacknowledged intersections, gaps, and frictions between the two -- suggest that a variety of ecocriticism grounded in the literatures, cultures, and places of the U.S. South has some vibrant years ahead of it. First, though, it is worth asking where Christopher Rieger and James L. Peacock's books achieve, and where they stop short of achieving, this kind of grounding. As a clearly written and carefully researched work of (mostly) secondwave ecocriticism, Rieger's Clear- Cutting Eden lays a solid foundation for future ecocritical approaches to southern authors, particularly the main subjects of the study: Erskine Caldwell, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Zora Neale Hurston, and William http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Grounding Southern Ecocriticism

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 45 (1) – Jul 19, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 The Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English and Comparative Literature.
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
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Abstract

Grounding Southern Ecocriticism by Bart H. Welling Clear- Cutting Eden: Ecology and the Pastoral in Southern Literature. By Christopher Rieger. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P, 2009. 202 pp. $39.75 cloth. Grounded Globalism: How the U.S. South Embraces the World. By James L. Peacock. Athens: U of Georgia P, 2010. 328 pp. $22.95 paper. What might the future of southern ecocriticism look like? Although neither of them tackles this question directly, and one of them doesn't bill itself as a work of ecocriticism at all, two studies from the last few years -- or, rather, the unacknowledged intersections, gaps, and frictions between the two -- suggest that a variety of ecocriticism grounded in the literatures, cultures, and places of the U.S. South has some vibrant years ahead of it. First, though, it is worth asking where Christopher Rieger and James L. Peacock's books achieve, and where they stop short of achieving, this kind of grounding. As a clearly written and carefully researched work of (mostly) secondwave ecocriticism, Rieger's Clear- Cutting Eden lays a solid foundation for future ecocritical approaches to southern authors, particularly the main subjects of the study: Erskine Caldwell, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Zora Neale Hurston, and William

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 19, 2012

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