Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

George Washington Cable and Bonaventure : A New Orleans Author's Literary Sojourn into Acadiana

George Washington Cable and Bonaventure : A New Orleans Author's Literary Sojourn into Acadiana George Washington Cable and Bonaventure: A New Orleans Author's Literary Sojourn into Acadiana by Paul Haspel In 1888, when George Washington Cable, the New Orleans author who had gained fame through his Creole stories and novels, published three stories of Acadian Louisiana as a novel titled Bonaventure, the book was the product of a longstanding interest on Cable's part in Acadiana and its people. Yet the book also became a way in which Cable could step away briefly from the controversies in which he was involved regarding civil rights for African Americans--a cause he espoused in the face of bitter opposition from much of the white South. In a very real sense, Bonaventure, with its emphasis on romance and its idyllic descriptions of Acadian life, became a kind of literary vacation on its author's part. That status contributes to both the novel's virtues -- careful recreation of Acadian language patterns, realistic description of the Acadian landscape--and its sentimental flaws. Cable had been interested in the Acadian area of Louisiana as far back as 1866. Then a young man of twenty-three, Cable was considering a career as a surveyor and had joined a surveying party collecting data in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

George Washington Cable and Bonaventure : A New Orleans Author's Literary Sojourn into Acadiana

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 35 (1) – Jun 3, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/george-washington-cable-and-bonaventure-a-new-orleans-author-s-24PvUEMgfr
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

George Washington Cable and Bonaventure: A New Orleans Author's Literary Sojourn into Acadiana by Paul Haspel In 1888, when George Washington Cable, the New Orleans author who had gained fame through his Creole stories and novels, published three stories of Acadian Louisiana as a novel titled Bonaventure, the book was the product of a longstanding interest on Cable's part in Acadiana and its people. Yet the book also became a way in which Cable could step away briefly from the controversies in which he was involved regarding civil rights for African Americans--a cause he espoused in the face of bitter opposition from much of the white South. In a very real sense, Bonaventure, with its emphasis on romance and its idyllic descriptions of Acadian life, became a kind of literary vacation on its author's part. That status contributes to both the novel's virtues -- careful recreation of Acadian language patterns, realistic description of the Acadian landscape--and its sentimental flaws. Cable had been interested in the Acadian area of Louisiana as far back as 1866. Then a young man of twenty-three, Cable was considering a career as a surveyor and had joined a surveying party collecting data in the

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 3, 2002

There are no references for this article.