Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

George Washington Cable and Bonaventure : A New Orleans Author's Literary Sojourn into Acadiana

George Washington Cable and Bonaventure : A New Orleans Author's Literary Sojourn into Acadiana George Washington Cable and Bonaventure: A New Orleans Author’s Literary Sojourn into Acadiana by Paul Haspel In 1888, when George Washington Cable, the New Orleans au- thor who had gained fame through his Creole stories and novels, pub- lished three stories of Acadian Louisiana as a novel titled Bonaventure, the book was the product of a longstanding interest on Cable’s part in Aca- diana and its people. Yet the book also became a way in which Cable could step away briefly from the controversies in which he was involved regarding civil rights for African Americans — a cause he espoused in the face of bitter opposition from much of the white South. In a very real sense, Bonaventure, with its emphasis on romance and its idyllic descrip- tions of Acadian life, became a kind of literary vacation on its author’s part. That status contributes to both the novel’s virtues — careful re- creation of Acadian language patterns, realistic description of the Aca- dian landscape — and its sentimental flaws. Cable had been interested in the Acadian area of Louisiana as far back as 1866. Then a young man of twenty-three, Cable was considering a ca- reer as a surveyor http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

George Washington Cable and Bonaventure : A New Orleans Author's Literary Sojourn into Acadiana

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 35 (1) – Mar 6, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/george-washington-cable-and-bonaventure-a-new-orleans-author-apos-s-LS9tbdtqeX
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

George Washington Cable and Bonaventure: A New Orleans Author’s Literary Sojourn into Acadiana by Paul Haspel In 1888, when George Washington Cable, the New Orleans au- thor who had gained fame through his Creole stories and novels, pub- lished three stories of Acadian Louisiana as a novel titled Bonaventure, the book was the product of a longstanding interest on Cable’s part in Aca- diana and its people. Yet the book also became a way in which Cable could step away briefly from the controversies in which he was involved regarding civil rights for African Americans — a cause he espoused in the face of bitter opposition from much of the white South. In a very real sense, Bonaventure, with its emphasis on romance and its idyllic descrip- tions of Acadian life, became a kind of literary vacation on its author’s part. That status contributes to both the novel’s virtues — careful re- creation of Acadian language patterns, realistic description of the Aca- dian landscape — and its sentimental flaws. Cable had been interested in the Acadian area of Louisiana as far back as 1866. Then a young man of twenty-three, Cable was considering a ca- reer as a surveyor

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 6, 2003

There are no references for this article.