Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

First Miles Philips, and Then Tony Last: The Noble Savage Myth in Hakluyt and in Waugh's A Handful of Dust

First Miles Philips, and Then Tony Last: The Noble Savage Myth in Hakluyt and in Waugh's A... Matt PhilliPs First Miles Philips, and Then Tony Last e N Th oble Savage Myth in Hakluyt and in Waugh’s A Handful of Dust In his 1582 “A discourse written by one Miles Philips Englishman, put on shore in the West Indies by Mr John Hawkins,” Miles Philips delivers a tale of shipwreck and captivity that ends with his heroic return to England. In 1934, Evelyn Waugh publishes the novel A Handful of Du , a st nother narrative of captivity, though one that leaves the reader with the tacit knowledge that protagonist Tony Last will live out the rest of his days imprisoned, reading Charles Dickens to his illiterate captor, Mr. Todd. Although separated by nearly four centuries, what links these tw - o nar ratives is how each intersects with the myth of the noble savage. Both Philips and Last find themselves in the role of the subjugated, finding themselves in a posi- tion to empathize with native peoples historically thought of by some as savages. Along with this subjugation comes the potential to experience the type of con- version expected of the legendary noble savage. Philips, the former invader and slave trader, undergoes what we might http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

First Miles Philips, and Then Tony Last: The Noble Savage Myth in Hakluyt and in Waugh's A Handful of Dust

The Comparatist , Volume 45 – Nov 11, 2021

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/first-miles-philips-and-then-tony-last-the-noble-savage-myth-in-rCqZSU1X35
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Copyright © Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Matt PhilliPs First Miles Philips, and Then Tony Last e N Th oble Savage Myth in Hakluyt and in Waugh’s A Handful of Dust In his 1582 “A discourse written by one Miles Philips Englishman, put on shore in the West Indies by Mr John Hawkins,” Miles Philips delivers a tale of shipwreck and captivity that ends with his heroic return to England. In 1934, Evelyn Waugh publishes the novel A Handful of Du , a st nother narrative of captivity, though one that leaves the reader with the tacit knowledge that protagonist Tony Last will live out the rest of his days imprisoned, reading Charles Dickens to his illiterate captor, Mr. Todd. Although separated by nearly four centuries, what links these tw - o nar ratives is how each intersects with the myth of the noble savage. Both Philips and Last find themselves in the role of the subjugated, finding themselves in a posi- tion to empathize with native peoples historically thought of by some as savages. Along with this subjugation comes the potential to experience the type of con- version expected of the legendary noble savage. Philips, the former invader and slave trader, undergoes what we might

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 11, 2021

There are no references for this article.