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Faulkner's "Fabulous Immeasurable Camelots": Absalom, Absalom! and Le Morte Darthur

Faulkner's "Fabulous Immeasurable Camelots": Absalom, Absalom! and Le Morte Darthur Faulkner’s “Fabulous Immeasurable Camelots”: Absalom, Absalom! and Le Morte Darthur by Taylor Hagood As the recent volume King Arthur in America by Alan and Bar- bara Tepa Lupack attests, William Faulkner used the Arthurian legend to articulate many of the major themes and motifs in his works. The Lupacks draw on previous scholarly material while adding their own ex- cellent insights, arguing that Faulkner’s Arthurianism, like Joyce and Eliot’s, negotiates the pathos of nostalgia for a lost past and provides an- other branch of mythology to inform a modernist interpretation of twentieth-century life. While immensely illuminating, the Lupacks’ work does not, however, purport to be the in-depth analysis that this largely overlooked aspect of Faulkner’s writing deserves. Absalom, Absalom! exemplifies Faulkner’s multifarious and intricate use of the Arthurian legend and so offers a point of reference for the rest of his oeuvre. In creating an Old South myth of “rise and fall” embodied in the Arthur-like Thomas Sutpen’s rise to and loss of power, Absalom, Ab- salom! represents a retelling of the Arthurian legend, especially as pre- sented by Sir Thomas Malory in Le Morte Darthur.Though Faulkner’s retelling borrows from many Arthurian works, its style, plot, and presen- tation, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Faulkner's "Fabulous Immeasurable Camelots": Absalom, Absalom! and Le Morte Darthur

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 34 (2) – Jun 1, 2002

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Faulkner’s “Fabulous Immeasurable Camelots”: Absalom, Absalom! and Le Morte Darthur by Taylor Hagood As the recent volume King Arthur in America by Alan and Bar- bara Tepa Lupack attests, William Faulkner used the Arthurian legend to articulate many of the major themes and motifs in his works. The Lupacks draw on previous scholarly material while adding their own ex- cellent insights, arguing that Faulkner’s Arthurianism, like Joyce and Eliot’s, negotiates the pathos of nostalgia for a lost past and provides an- other branch of mythology to inform a modernist interpretation of twentieth-century life. While immensely illuminating, the Lupacks’ work does not, however, purport to be the in-depth analysis that this largely overlooked aspect of Faulkner’s writing deserves. Absalom, Absalom! exemplifies Faulkner’s multifarious and intricate use of the Arthurian legend and so offers a point of reference for the rest of his oeuvre. In creating an Old South myth of “rise and fall” embodied in the Arthur-like Thomas Sutpen’s rise to and loss of power, Absalom, Ab- salom! represents a retelling of the Arthurian legend, especially as pre- sented by Sir Thomas Malory in Le Morte Darthur.Though Faulkner’s retelling borrows from many Arthurian works, its style, plot, and presen- tation,

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 1, 2002

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