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Family Sagas of the Americas: Los Sangurimas and A Thousand Acres

Family Sagas of the Americas: Los Sangurimas and A Thousand Acres Family Sagas of the Americas: Los Sangurimas and A Thousand Acres Lori Ween The Comparatist, Volume 20, May 1996, pp. 111-125 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.1996.0015 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/415114/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 11:14 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAnATIST FAMILY SAGAS OF THE AMERICAS: LOS SANGURIMAS AND A THOUSAND ACRES Lori Ween What exactly is a family saga? What structures or themes allow certain works to be designated as such, and what are the connections between a text, its historical perspective, and the oral tradition? How does tradition itself translate into the written form? Some scholars have sought to define the criteria for this designation, yet many questions re- main, as the definition must stretch to include stories from diverse cultures with varying modes ofrepresentation. An understanding of how the famüy saga functions in society as an important cultural artifact is vital to the concretization of the genre. Certain traits appear to me as constants throughout various family sagas, and I wül analyze José de la Cuadra's Los Sangurimas (1934) and Jane Smüey's A Thousand Acres (1991) as novels exploring and re- veaUng the foUowing generic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Family Sagas of the Americas: Los Sangurimas and A Thousand Acres

The Comparatist , Volume 20 – Oct 3, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Family Sagas of the Americas: Los Sangurimas and A Thousand Acres Lori Ween The Comparatist, Volume 20, May 1996, pp. 111-125 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.1996.0015 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/415114/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 11:14 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAnATIST FAMILY SAGAS OF THE AMERICAS: LOS SANGURIMAS AND A THOUSAND ACRES Lori Ween What exactly is a family saga? What structures or themes allow certain works to be designated as such, and what are the connections between a text, its historical perspective, and the oral tradition? How does tradition itself translate into the written form? Some scholars have sought to define the criteria for this designation, yet many questions re- main, as the definition must stretch to include stories from diverse cultures with varying modes ofrepresentation. An understanding of how the famüy saga functions in society as an important cultural artifact is vital to the concretization of the genre. Certain traits appear to me as constants throughout various family sagas, and I wül analyze José de la Cuadra's Los Sangurimas (1934) and Jane Smüey's A Thousand Acres (1991) as novels exploring and re- veaUng the foUowing generic

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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