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Fénelon’s Subversive Uses of Aeneid 6

Fénelon’s Subversive Uses of Aeneid 6 IppokratIs kantzIos Fénelon's Subversive Uses of Aeneid 6 François Fénelon's The Adventures of Telemachus, Son of Ulysses (1699) is a novel that the general audience has forgotten today. Yet it was not only the most popular literary work of the eighteenth century, but also an important point of reference in the political, pedagogical and theological discussions of pre-revolutionary France and beyond. Montesquieu described it as a divine work that brings Homer to life, and Rousseau thought that Fénelon's book alone was sufficient for the education of his fictional student Emile.1 As it happens, The Adventures of Telemachus was written for the education of another--real--student, the Duc de Bourgogne, grandson of Louis XIV, to whom Fénelon had been appointed tutor in 1689. In his effort to engage this young mind, the author decided to avoid pedantic instruction; instead he created "a fabulous narration in the form of a heroic poem, like those of Homer and of Virgil," into which he incorporated the major lessons suitable for a prince who, by virtue of his birth, was destined to reign (letter to Father LeTellier, in Riley, François de Fénelon xviii; Maréchaux 59­74). Yet, despite the novel's mythological pretensions, its thematic preoccupations http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Fénelon’s Subversive Uses of Aeneid 6

The Comparatist , Volume 40 – Nov 11, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
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Abstract

IppokratIs kantzIos Fénelon's Subversive Uses of Aeneid 6 François Fénelon's The Adventures of Telemachus, Son of Ulysses (1699) is a novel that the general audience has forgotten today. Yet it was not only the most popular literary work of the eighteenth century, but also an important point of reference in the political, pedagogical and theological discussions of pre-revolutionary France and beyond. Montesquieu described it as a divine work that brings Homer to life, and Rousseau thought that Fénelon's book alone was sufficient for the education of his fictional student Emile.1 As it happens, The Adventures of Telemachus was written for the education of another--real--student, the Duc de Bourgogne, grandson of Louis XIV, to whom Fénelon had been appointed tutor in 1689. In his effort to engage this young mind, the author decided to avoid pedantic instruction; instead he created "a fabulous narration in the form of a heroic poem, like those of Homer and of Virgil," into which he incorporated the major lessons suitable for a prince who, by virtue of his birth, was destined to reign (letter to Father LeTellier, in Riley, François de Fénelon xviii; Maréchaux 59­74). Yet, despite the novel's mythological pretensions, its thematic preoccupations

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 11, 2016

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