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Education as Liberation: African American Literature and Abolition Pedagogy in the Sunbelt Prison Classroom

Education as Liberation: African American Literature and Abolition Pedagogy in the Sunbelt Prison... Patric K e lliot a lexander e duc ation as l iber ation African American Literature and Abolition Pedagogy in the Sunbelt Prison Classroom In her speec h, “The Prison-Industrial Complex” (1997), renowned scholar, anti-prison activist , and I seek to former political prisoner Angela Y. Davis articu - lates a pedagogical philosophy that has inspired cultivate my years of teac hing African American literat ure in classrooms the prisons of the American South. Recalling her experiences with teac hing incarcerated women at where a California jail, Davis states: “Coalitional forma- imprisoned tions that link academic communities and impris- oned communities can potenti ally produce great men can, if only changes. [Yet] people in [ jails and] prisons are gen- temporarily, erally considered to be people who have no agency. We often fail to recognize that prisoners are human experience beings who have a right to participate in trans- desired learning formative project s” (The Meaning of Freedom 53). Davis’s affi rmation of the humanit y and agency of community incarcerated students reinforces a larger argument and human that she develops in the speec h about inviting and incorporating instructional approaches to jail and community prison classrooms that aim http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Education as Liberation: African American Literature and Abolition Pedagogy in the Sunbelt Prison Classroom

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 50 (1) – Aug 24, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Patric K e lliot a lexander e duc ation as l iber ation African American Literature and Abolition Pedagogy in the Sunbelt Prison Classroom In her speec h, “The Prison-Industrial Complex” (1997), renowned scholar, anti-prison activist , and I seek to former political prisoner Angela Y. Davis articu - lates a pedagogical philosophy that has inspired cultivate my years of teac hing African American literat ure in classrooms the prisons of the American South. Recalling her experiences with teac hing incarcerated women at where a California jail, Davis states: “Coalitional forma- imprisoned tions that link academic communities and impris- oned communities can potenti ally produce great men can, if only changes. [Yet] people in [ jails and] prisons are gen- temporarily, erally considered to be people who have no agency. We often fail to recognize that prisoners are human experience beings who have a right to participate in trans- desired learning formative project s” (The Meaning of Freedom 53). Davis’s affi rmation of the humanit y and agency of community incarcerated students reinforces a larger argument and human that she develops in the speec h about inviting and incorporating instructional approaches to jail and community prison classrooms that aim

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 24, 2018

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