Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Editors' Note

Editors' Note editors’ note The Southern L iterary Journal has had few special issues over the years — the Fall 1998 issue on contemporary southern women’s writing was only our second — and nineteenth century literature might seem an un- likely candidate for such a distinction. After all, every issue of the journal has articles on nineteenth century writing — on Poe, Douglass, Twain, Chopin, and Chesnutt, among other writers. In recent years, however, most of our articles — nearly eighty percent over the past four years — have dealt with twentieth century writers, many of them with contem- porary literature. It was largely for this reason that we called for contri- butions to an all-nineteenth century issue. We received pieces on certain of the usual subjects — Twain, Chopin, and Chesnutt — but also on the lesser-known Sherwood Bonner, Ruth McEnery Stuart, and Anna Julia Cooper. The contributors’ approaches range from ( in one or two cases) rather traditional readings to regional and postcolonial theory. Most fall under the broad umbrella of historical and cultural studies. Of the criti- cal triumvirate, race, class, and gender, race seems to predominate — al- though, in fact, particularly in the two treatments of Chopin included herein, one can hardly separate race and gender. In any case, we were en- couraged by the number and quality of contributions — so much so that we plan another special issue, this one on autobiography, a year or so down the road. FH http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Editors' Note

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 35 (1) – Mar 6, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/editors-apos-note-mvy31YytFr
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

editors’ note The Southern L iterary Journal has had few special issues over the years — the Fall 1998 issue on contemporary southern women’s writing was only our second — and nineteenth century literature might seem an un- likely candidate for such a distinction. After all, every issue of the journal has articles on nineteenth century writing — on Poe, Douglass, Twain, Chopin, and Chesnutt, among other writers. In recent years, however, most of our articles — nearly eighty percent over the past four years — have dealt with twentieth century writers, many of them with contem- porary literature. It was largely for this reason that we called for contri- butions to an all-nineteenth century issue. We received pieces on certain of the usual subjects — Twain, Chopin, and Chesnutt — but also on the lesser-known Sherwood Bonner, Ruth McEnery Stuart, and Anna Julia Cooper. The contributors’ approaches range from ( in one or two cases) rather traditional readings to regional and postcolonial theory. Most fall under the broad umbrella of historical and cultural studies. Of the criti- cal triumvirate, race, class, and gender, race seems to predominate — al- though, in fact, particularly in the two treatments of Chopin included herein, one can hardly separate race and gender. In any case, we were en- couraged by the number and quality of contributions — so much so that we plan another special issue, this one on autobiography, a year or so down the road. FH

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 6, 2003

There are no references for this article.