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Editor’s Note: Reconstruction

Editor’s Note: Reconstruction editor’s note Reconstruction As I write this note, I want to acknowledge the passing of one of the fi eld’s most inspired and infl uential scholars: Patricia (Patsy) Yaeger, author of Dirt and Desire: Reconstructing Southern Women’s Writings, 1930–1990. Sometime in the near future, this journal will devote an issue to the impact of her work. We have lost a scholar who wrote brilliantly and gracefully about this new south that we inhabit and interrogate. Th is is the next to last iteration of the Southern Literary Journal, which is to become south: a scholarly journal in the fall of 2015. Given its new home in the Department of American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the new south will shift its focus from the literary to embrace interdisciplinary work more fully—a move already evidenced in SLJ’s last issue on the Gulf South. Captaining this move over the last six months has been a remarkable experience. I cannot say enough about the supportive eff orts of the outgoing editors, Minrose Gwin and Florence Dore, whose marks are felt here in the selection of essays for this issue. Th ey have made this transition as smooth http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Editor’s Note: Reconstruction

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 47 (1) – May 29, 2015

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

editor’s note Reconstruction As I write this note, I want to acknowledge the passing of one of the fi eld’s most inspired and infl uential scholars: Patricia (Patsy) Yaeger, author of Dirt and Desire: Reconstructing Southern Women’s Writings, 1930–1990. Sometime in the near future, this journal will devote an issue to the impact of her work. We have lost a scholar who wrote brilliantly and gracefully about this new south that we inhabit and interrogate. Th is is the next to last iteration of the Southern Literary Journal, which is to become south: a scholarly journal in the fall of 2015. Given its new home in the Department of American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the new south will shift its focus from the literary to embrace interdisciplinary work more fully—a move already evidenced in SLJ’s last issue on the Gulf South. Captaining this move over the last six months has been a remarkable experience. I cannot say enough about the supportive eff orts of the outgoing editors, Minrose Gwin and Florence Dore, whose marks are felt here in the selection of essays for this issue. Th ey have made this transition as smooth

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 29, 2015

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