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Editor’s Note: Go-Go

Editor’s Note: Go-Go You both experience this cut ,which she keeps insisting is a joke, a joke stuck in her throat , and like any other injury, you watc h it rupture along its suddenly exposed suture. —Claudia Rankine, Citizen: An American Lyric (2014) Our generation had our childhoods stolen from us—too invisible to notice at fi rst, the micro-aggressions of desegregation were on the daily, so we grew up in a cutti ng culture—tiny nicks hidden away. We reached adulthood and only then did we start bleeding—no longer afraid to call what we experienced “suffering.” Our parents marched and had bloody feet to show—we were prone to internal bleeding. It made us dangerous as other human animals could sense the lethal coil at the heart of our injured selves. There is a practical reason why people of African descent have more clotting factor—it is nature’s way of compensation for the sanguine attrition. Now that’ s deep . . . ■ My Deep is funk. Not the funk of James Brown and George Clinton, but the funk of the late Chuc k Brown, Rare Essence and Trouble Funk, and that sound called “go-go”—a relentless call and response of rhythm and not-rhy me. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Editor’s Note: Go-Go

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 48 (1) – Jul 3, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

You both experience this cut ,which she keeps insisting is a joke, a joke stuck in her throat , and like any other injury, you watc h it rupture along its suddenly exposed suture. —Claudia Rankine, Citizen: An American Lyric (2014) Our generation had our childhoods stolen from us—too invisible to notice at fi rst, the micro-aggressions of desegregation were on the daily, so we grew up in a cutti ng culture—tiny nicks hidden away. We reached adulthood and only then did we start bleeding—no longer afraid to call what we experienced “suffering.” Our parents marched and had bloody feet to show—we were prone to internal bleeding. It made us dangerous as other human animals could sense the lethal coil at the heart of our injured selves. There is a practical reason why people of African descent have more clotting factor—it is nature’s way of compensation for the sanguine attrition. Now that’ s deep . . . ■ My Deep is funk. Not the funk of James Brown and George Clinton, but the funk of the late Chuc k Brown, Rare Essence and Trouble Funk, and that sound called “go-go”—a relentless call and response of rhythm and not-rhy me.

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 3, 2016

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