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Editor’s Note: Dirt and Desire

Editor’s Note: Dirt and Desire Our second issue of south is dedicated to Patsy Yaeger’s path-breaking Dirt and Desire: Reconstructing Southern Women’s Writing 1930–1990. Pub- lished in 2000, the book set a new paradigm for inquiry and perhaps even a longing for study of and in the south. In many ways this jour- nal’s new direction represents the child of that endeavor. When James Crank came to me with the proposal for a special issue on Yaeger’s work, I couldn’t have framed it better myself. This issue’s focus on Dirt and Desire showcases writi ng from a variety of scholarly locations and in it, you will nd fi critical and creative non-fiction, speculative and archival home spaces. I will leave it to Professor Crank to articu late the inte llectual terrain for this issue. In the meantime, I would like to give readers a taste of what’s to come. We will be back to special issues in Fall of 2017 with “Crisis/Opport unity.” I am pleased to announce that board member, Robin D. G. Kelley will be the guest editor of this exciti ng collection of scholarly manifestos and report s from the troubli ng terrain of our con- temporary southern cosmos. Please see the CFP both here and on-line (southjournal.org). In leaving you this time, I want to make a few parti ng remarks. When I read this collection of ne fi essays and reflections on the work and life of Patsy Yaeger in its entiret y, I wept . Joy and grief. Despair and longing . These are the halogen moments of our present in the “south. ” We hold our breath waiting for some good news for a change. I recall the words echoed across the essays collected here: all we have or know is mostly given to many of us through her words, as some of us were not lucky enough to come into her orbit. If that’s all we have or know, it sustai ns us. It sust ains me. I, for one am glad for Patsy Yaeger. RIP. Shar on P. holland Editor http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Editor’s Note: Dirt and Desire

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 48 (2) – Nov 17, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Our second issue of south is dedicated to Patsy Yaeger’s path-breaking Dirt and Desire: Reconstructing Southern Women’s Writing 1930–1990. Pub- lished in 2000, the book set a new paradigm for inquiry and perhaps even a longing for study of and in the south. In many ways this jour- nal’s new direction represents the child of that endeavor. When James Crank came to me with the proposal for a special issue on Yaeger’s work, I couldn’t have framed it better myself. This issue’s focus on Dirt and Desire showcases writi ng from a variety of scholarly locations and in it, you will nd fi critical and creative non-fiction, speculative and archival home spaces. I will leave it to Professor Crank to articu late the inte llectual terrain for this issue. In the meantime, I would like to give readers a taste of what’s to come. We will be back to special issues in Fall of 2017 with “Crisis/Opport unity.” I am pleased to announce that board member, Robin D. G. Kelley will be the guest editor of this exciti ng collection of scholarly manifestos and report s from the troubli ng terrain of our con- temporary southern cosmos. Please see the CFP both here and on-line (southjournal.org). In leaving you this time, I want to make a few parti ng remarks. When I read this collection of ne fi essays and reflections on the work and life of Patsy Yaeger in its entiret y, I wept . Joy and grief. Despair and longing . These are the halogen moments of our present in the “south. ” We hold our breath waiting for some good news for a change. I recall the words echoed across the essays collected here: all we have or know is mostly given to many of us through her words, as some of us were not lucky enough to come into her orbit. If that’s all we have or know, it sustai ns us. It sust ains me. I, for one am glad for Patsy Yaeger. RIP. Shar on P. holland Editor

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 17, 2016

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