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Editor's Column: Vectors of Comparison

Editor's Column: Vectors of Comparison ??? COMPAKATIST Vectors, once they are separated from their sinister medical meaning, highlight some key connections among this year's articles in The Comparatisi. As a term that some of us recall from analytical geometry, it encourages questions about cultural locations and frames of reference; as a word at times overheard on airplanes, it suggests rapidly shifting movement in space as well as time. Vectors of both these kinds recall two of Edward Said's most influential contributions to our field. Thus at one level the word evokes the surge of interest in East-West cultural transactions following Orientalism, still a major force after a quarter century. Less often cited (for how much scholarship can rival that book?) is "Traveling Theory," from 77ie World, the Text, and the Critic. Critiquing the potential rigidities of high theory, Said shows by example how changing cultural contexts can alter the function and meaning of critical ideas. Our first unit invokes a forum in this journal several years ago, on "Literary Canons After the Canon Wars." These canons, of course, were Western ones, though comparatists who read both Allan and Harold Bloom, the champions in those wars, probably noted that the first favored philosophy and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Editor's Column: Vectors of Comparison

The Comparatist , Volume 27 (1) – Oct 3, 2003

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
Publisher site
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Abstract

??? COMPAKATIST Vectors, once they are separated from their sinister medical meaning, highlight some key connections among this year's articles in The Comparatisi. As a term that some of us recall from analytical geometry, it encourages questions about cultural locations and frames of reference; as a word at times overheard on airplanes, it suggests rapidly shifting movement in space as well as time. Vectors of both these kinds recall two of Edward Said's most influential contributions to our field. Thus at one level the word evokes the surge of interest in East-West cultural transactions following Orientalism, still a major force after a quarter century. Less often cited (for how much scholarship can rival that book?) is "Traveling Theory," from 77ie World, the Text, and the Critic. Critiquing the potential rigidities of high theory, Said shows by example how changing cultural contexts can alter the function and meaning of critical ideas. Our first unit invokes a forum in this journal several years ago, on "Literary Canons After the Canon Wars." These canons, of course, were Western ones, though comparatists who read both Allan and Harold Bloom, the champions in those wars, probably noted that the first favored philosophy and

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2003

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