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Editor's Column: Comparative Literature Between the West and the World

Editor's Column: Comparative Literature Between the West and the World ??? COHPAnATIST This issue of 77ie Comparatist, the twenty-fifth since Harry Rutledge encouraged Jeanne Smoot to found the journal in 1977, offers a good occasion to review our place within literary study in the United States. The anniversary bibliography at the end of this volume, with over two hundred items, reveals a widening of horizons that includes many of the new trends highlighted a few years ago in the Bernheimer Report to the American Comparative Literature Association. Traditional topics, like "Greco-Roman Legacies," "Cross-Cultural and Intertextual Relations Among Western Traditions," or "Comparative Studies in Twentieth-Century Western Literature," certainly persist. But they have increasingly been joined by "European/Non-European Literary Relations," "Third World, Afro-Caribbean, and Eastern European Comparative Studies," and "Inter-American Literary Exchanges," the last of which cuts across the tendency to place the literatures of the US or Latin America in European contexts. After its revival foUowing the second World War, comparative literature in this country aimed mainly to reconnect the literatures of the West, either in their own right or through their roots in classical antiquity. But since the 1960s, with decolonization, the new waves of immigration, and a more marked internationalization of the American academy, the field has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Editor's Column: Comparative Literature Between the West and the World

The Comparatist , Volume 25 (1) – Oct 3, 2001

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
Publisher site
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Abstract

??? COHPAnATIST This issue of 77ie Comparatist, the twenty-fifth since Harry Rutledge encouraged Jeanne Smoot to found the journal in 1977, offers a good occasion to review our place within literary study in the United States. The anniversary bibliography at the end of this volume, with over two hundred items, reveals a widening of horizons that includes many of the new trends highlighted a few years ago in the Bernheimer Report to the American Comparative Literature Association. Traditional topics, like "Greco-Roman Legacies," "Cross-Cultural and Intertextual Relations Among Western Traditions," or "Comparative Studies in Twentieth-Century Western Literature," certainly persist. But they have increasingly been joined by "European/Non-European Literary Relations," "Third World, Afro-Caribbean, and Eastern European Comparative Studies," and "Inter-American Literary Exchanges," the last of which cuts across the tendency to place the literatures of the US or Latin America in European contexts. After its revival foUowing the second World War, comparative literature in this country aimed mainly to reconnect the literatures of the West, either in their own right or through their roots in classical antiquity. But since the 1960s, with decolonization, the new waves of immigration, and a more marked internationalization of the American academy, the field has

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2001

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