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Editor's Note

Editor's Note EDITOR'S NOTE JASON KYLE HOWARD hen this magazine was founded nearly fifty Wyears ago by the poet Albert Stewart, readers would have been hard-pressed to find quality literature about contemporary Appalachia that was both widely available and consistently published. Such writing existed, to be sure, in the work of writers including Lisa Alther, 5 Harriette Simpson Arnow, Annie Dillard, Wilma Dykeman, Nikki Giovanni, Jim Wayne Miller, Gurney Norman, Lee Smith, James Still, and others. But the gaps of time between releases was lengthy. Black writers, writers of color, indigenous writers, queer writers, and women writers were all woefully underrepresented. A few weeks ago, as I was thumbing through a list of new releases and upcoming books focused on Appalachia, I had one of those moments. You know the kind I’m talking about— when the past seems both distant and near, when an epiphany arrives with a shiver. As editor of Appalachian Review, I am especially conscious of the editors who preceded me. I think of what the job must have been like for the magazine's earliest editors, Al Stewart and Sidney Saylor Farr. Sometimes, it feels like I have invited them into my office. I wonder how they might http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Appalachian Review University of North Carolina Press

Editor's Note

Appalachian Review , Volume 49 (3) – Sep 10, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Berea College
ISSN
2692-9244
eISSN
2692-9287

Abstract

EDITOR'S NOTE JASON KYLE HOWARD hen this magazine was founded nearly fifty Wyears ago by the poet Albert Stewart, readers would have been hard-pressed to find quality literature about contemporary Appalachia that was both widely available and consistently published. Such writing existed, to be sure, in the work of writers including Lisa Alther, 5 Harriette Simpson Arnow, Annie Dillard, Wilma Dykeman, Nikki Giovanni, Jim Wayne Miller, Gurney Norman, Lee Smith, James Still, and others. But the gaps of time between releases was lengthy. Black writers, writers of color, indigenous writers, queer writers, and women writers were all woefully underrepresented. A few weeks ago, as I was thumbing through a list of new releases and upcoming books focused on Appalachia, I had one of those moments. You know the kind I’m talking about— when the past seems both distant and near, when an epiphany arrives with a shiver. As editor of Appalachian Review, I am especially conscious of the editors who preceded me. I think of what the job must have been like for the magazine's earliest editors, Al Stewart and Sidney Saylor Farr. Sometimes, it feels like I have invited them into my office. I wonder how they might

Journal

Appalachian ReviewUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Sep 10, 2021

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