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Editor's Column: Intertextualities, Cosmopolitanisms, and Comparative Literature

Editor's Column: Intertextualities, Cosmopolitanisms, and Comparative Literature eDitor’ S c olu mn Intertextualities, Cosmopolitanisms, and Comparative Literature i Th s issue brings together the best of the S cla , with contributors representing long standing members and former oc ffi ers, junior newcomers to the organization, mid- career newcomers to our conferences, students (some as early in their career as mas- ters students), and junior scholars. No less signic fi ant, it shows the extent to which the Scla has fostered a diverse membership—senior scholars whose attendance at our conferences serves to mentor younger scholars, young scholars who travel great distances to participate within a constructive ambiance, and students who come to the Scla in order to learn how to present a conference paper as well as (at times) bring them to the point of publication. Scla conferences are enhanced by regional, national, and international scholars; students, independent scholars, and professors. Although I have had considerable experience in both national and international comparative literature associations, I am always astounded by how the Scla serves such a varied population. I began my publishing career with e Th Comparatist . e Th editor at that time, John Burt Foster, carefully nursed my initial work into publish- able form. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Editor's Column: Intertextualities, Cosmopolitanisms, and Comparative Literature

The Comparatist , Volume 35 – Jun 15, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

eDitor’ S c olu mn Intertextualities, Cosmopolitanisms, and Comparative Literature i Th s issue brings together the best of the S cla , with contributors representing long standing members and former oc ffi ers, junior newcomers to the organization, mid- career newcomers to our conferences, students (some as early in their career as mas- ters students), and junior scholars. No less signic fi ant, it shows the extent to which the Scla has fostered a diverse membership—senior scholars whose attendance at our conferences serves to mentor younger scholars, young scholars who travel great distances to participate within a constructive ambiance, and students who come to the Scla in order to learn how to present a conference paper as well as (at times) bring them to the point of publication. Scla conferences are enhanced by regional, national, and international scholars; students, independent scholars, and professors. Although I have had considerable experience in both national and international comparative literature associations, I am always astounded by how the Scla serves such a varied population. I began my publishing career with e Th Comparatist . e Th editor at that time, John Burt Foster, carefully nursed my initial work into publish- able form.

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 15, 2011

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