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Down n’ Dirty

Down n’ Dirty J ameS a. Crank Rubbish is something people look at all the time without onus or shame or desire, whereas waste is something It’s time that must be secreted away, hidden, a southern matter of attraction and shame. —Patricia Yaeger, Dirt and Desire studies scholars own Queer silence In his Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South, E. Patrick its dirt—and we Johnson interviews “Joe,” a student at Nicholls State need to do so University in Thibodeaux, Louisiana. Joe is one of the “young’uns” that Johnson documents in the immediately. section “Across Generations.” Born in 1984, the Right now, young man is out and engaged in his community; he is an active member of the “gay and lesbian stu- in fact. dent organizations on his campus” (Johnson 528). When Johnson asks Joe to “describe the infl uence of [his] southern upbringing on [his] ability to come to terms with or even recognize [his] sexual orienta- tion,” he answers, I do think it made me a little bit more afraid. It made me feel dirty, feeling, like having cook- ing oil dripped all over you and that nastiness, because . . . I’ve always felt like I’ve had to keep http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

J ameS a. Crank Rubbish is something people look at all the time without onus or shame or desire, whereas waste is something It’s time that must be secreted away, hidden, a southern matter of attraction and shame. —Patricia Yaeger, Dirt and Desire studies scholars own Queer silence In his Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South, E. Patrick its dirt—and we Johnson interviews “Joe,” a student at Nicholls State need to do so University in Thibodeaux, Louisiana. Joe is one of the “young’uns” that Johnson documents in the immediately. section “Across Generations.” Born in 1984, the Right now, young man is out and engaged in his community; he is an active member of the “gay and lesbian stu- in fact. dent organizations on his campus” (Johnson 528). When Johnson asks Joe to “describe the infl uence of [his] southern upbringing on [his] ability to come to terms with or even recognize [his] sexual orienta- tion,” he answers, I do think it made me a little bit more afraid. It made me feel dirty, feeling, like having cook- ing oil dripped all over you and that nastiness, because . . . I’ve always felt like I’ve had to keep

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 17, 2016

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