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Distanced from Dirt: Transnational Vietnam in the U.S. South

Distanced from Dirt: Transnational Vietnam in the U.S. South Cynthia Wu distanced fr om dirt Transnational Vietnam in the U.S. South In Dirt and Desire: Reconstructing Southern Women’s Literature, 1930–1990, Patricia Yaeger stakes a claim Not all contact for continued inquiry—which in the year 2000 may have been necessary—into the literary production with dirt is that has emerged from the U.S. South. Although it may seem that “[t]o revisit the white texts equal. Not all spawned in the Jim Crow South . . . is to exit from the con- time spent in it temporary excitements of African, Asian, or Latin leads to more. American studies, to go South to a very Old Place” (61), Yaeger convincingly argues for the ongoing relevance of southern literature by both white and black authors. I want to redirect, however, this affi r- mation of her archive in the face of U.S. ethnic stud- ies’ transnational commitments, a turn in the 1990s that injected new interest into the study of com- munities of color in the United States. Might the concerns that have preoccupied southern studies exist in closer proximity to contemporary U.S. eth- nic studies than we have previously thought? Might the South have anything to tell us about histories of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Distanced from Dirt: Transnational Vietnam in the U.S. South

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 48 (2) – Nov 17, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Cynthia Wu distanced fr om dirt Transnational Vietnam in the U.S. South In Dirt and Desire: Reconstructing Southern Women’s Literature, 1930–1990, Patricia Yaeger stakes a claim Not all contact for continued inquiry—which in the year 2000 may have been necessary—into the literary production with dirt is that has emerged from the U.S. South. Although it may seem that “[t]o revisit the white texts equal. Not all spawned in the Jim Crow South . . . is to exit from the con- time spent in it temporary excitements of African, Asian, or Latin leads to more. American studies, to go South to a very Old Place” (61), Yaeger convincingly argues for the ongoing relevance of southern literature by both white and black authors. I want to redirect, however, this affi r- mation of her archive in the face of U.S. ethnic stud- ies’ transnational commitments, a turn in the 1990s that injected new interest into the study of com- munities of color in the United States. Might the concerns that have preoccupied southern studies exist in closer proximity to contemporary U.S. eth- nic studies than we have previously thought? Might the South have anything to tell us about histories of

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 17, 2016

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