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"Directing" the Reader: Khodasevich's "Sorrento Photographs" and Montage

"Directing" the Reader: Khodasevich's "Sorrento Photographs" and Montage "Directing" the Reader: Khodasevich's "Sorrento Photographs" and Montage Jason Brooks The Comparatist, Volume 28, May 2004, pp. 39-51 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2004.0003 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414792/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:57 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAKATIST "DIRECTING" THE READER: KHODASEVICH'S "SORRENTO PHOTOGRAPHS' AND MONTAGE Jason Brooks Each performance in the theater is unique. Actors have the leeway to adapt to the audience or to make adjustments from one night to the next; there is room for unexpected error; indeed, the actress who plays Oph- elia one night may no longer be playing the role a week later. Not so in motion pictures. The final product as viewed in the movie theater is unchanging. The director of the film provides the moviegoer with a singular version of the work: actors were directed; editing and special effects were completed before the sprocket hits the perf; adjustment from night to night is impossible. This unchanging quality of a film coupled with the passive role of the viewer creates a strange dynamic between spectator and spectacle. Spectators do have a level of freedom when watching a film, since all texts http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

"Directing" the Reader: Khodasevich's "Sorrento Photographs" and Montage

The Comparatist , Volume 28 – Oct 3, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

"Directing" the Reader: Khodasevich's "Sorrento Photographs" and Montage Jason Brooks The Comparatist, Volume 28, May 2004, pp. 39-51 (Article) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2004.0003 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414792/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:57 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAKATIST "DIRECTING" THE READER: KHODASEVICH'S "SORRENTO PHOTOGRAPHS' AND MONTAGE Jason Brooks Each performance in the theater is unique. Actors have the leeway to adapt to the audience or to make adjustments from one night to the next; there is room for unexpected error; indeed, the actress who plays Oph- elia one night may no longer be playing the role a week later. Not so in motion pictures. The final product as viewed in the movie theater is unchanging. The director of the film provides the moviegoer with a singular version of the work: actors were directed; editing and special effects were completed before the sprocket hits the perf; adjustment from night to night is impossible. This unchanging quality of a film coupled with the passive role of the viewer creates a strange dynamic between spectator and spectacle. Spectators do have a level of freedom when watching a film, since all texts

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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