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Death at the Edges of Empire: Fallen Soldiers, Cultural Memory, and the Making of an American Nation, 1863–1921 by Shannon Bontrager (review)

Death at the Edges of Empire: Fallen Soldiers, Cultural Memory, and the Making of an American... Fluker highlights several significant successes of Missouri’s reconcili - ationist commemorative tradition, including the unprecedented merger of the National Cemetery in Springfield with the adjacent Confederate cemetery; the equally extraordinary placement of a monument to both sides, funded by an appropriation by the Missouri General Assembly, at Vicksburg National Military Park in 1917; and the establishment of blue and gray societies for economic and political networking. Fluker concludes her examination of Missouri’s reconciliationist commemorative tradition with a case study of the state’s Confederate and Federal soldiers’ homes, both of which began as private institutions established through women’s organizational efforts but were shortly thereafter subsumed by the state. For Fluker, state control of the homes personified the pragmatism of Missouri’s reconciliation movement, as well as its existence alongside sep- arate memorial traditions. Commonwealth of Compromise will appeal to scholars of Civil War mem- ory and Missouri history. At about two hundred pages of crisply written text, the book is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Fluker’s epilogue is sure to stimulate interest among the younger genera- tion, as she examines how the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson and subsequent Black Lives Matter protests, followed by the Mother Emanuel http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Death at the Edges of Empire: Fallen Soldiers, Cultural Memory, and the Making of an American Nation, 1863–1921 by Shannon Bontrager (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Fluker highlights several significant successes of Missouri’s reconcili - ationist commemorative tradition, including the unprecedented merger of the National Cemetery in Springfield with the adjacent Confederate cemetery; the equally extraordinary placement of a monument to both sides, funded by an appropriation by the Missouri General Assembly, at Vicksburg National Military Park in 1917; and the establishment of blue and gray societies for economic and political networking. Fluker concludes her examination of Missouri’s reconciliationist commemorative tradition with a case study of the state’s Confederate and Federal soldiers’ homes, both of which began as private institutions established through women’s organizational efforts but were shortly thereafter subsumed by the state. For Fluker, state control of the homes personified the pragmatism of Missouri’s reconciliation movement, as well as its existence alongside sep- arate memorial traditions. Commonwealth of Compromise will appeal to scholars of Civil War mem- ory and Missouri history. At about two hundred pages of crisply written text, the book is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Fluker’s epilogue is sure to stimulate interest among the younger genera- tion, as she examines how the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson and subsequent Black Lives Matter protests, followed by the Mother Emanuel

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 12, 2021

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