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Culture, Memory, and the Legacies of Lynching

Culture, Memory, and the Legacies of Lynching Culture, Memory, and the Legacies of Lynching by Christopher Metress Langston Hughes and American Lynching Culture. By W. Jason Miller. Gainesville: UP of Florida. 2011. xiv + 168 pp. $44.95 cloth. $19.95 paper. Mary Turner and the Memory of Lynching. By Julie Buckner Armstrong. U of Georgia P. 2011. xii + 255 pp. $69.95 cloth. $24.95 paper. More than fifteen years have passed since the 1997 publication of Joel Williamson's "Wounds Not Scars: Lynching, the National Conscience, and the American Historian." In this controversial essay, Williamson confessed to readers of the Journal of American History that he "learned about white people massively lynching black people only as a scholar in the middle years of the 1960s," and "learned about it by accident" while he was "looking for something else": the origins of segregation. According to Williamson, "Nothing in my living experience as a southerner and an American, nothing in my training and practice as an historian and a professor, had prepared me for this." Much has changed in the fifty years since one of the South's leading historians stumbled upon lynching by accident. Seminal works by Jacqueline Dowd Hall, Trudier Harris, Fitzhugh Brundage, James Allen, and Jacqueline Goldbsy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Culture, Memory, and the Legacies of Lynching

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 46 (1) – Feb 13, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English .
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
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Abstract

Culture, Memory, and the Legacies of Lynching by Christopher Metress Langston Hughes and American Lynching Culture. By W. Jason Miller. Gainesville: UP of Florida. 2011. xiv + 168 pp. $44.95 cloth. $19.95 paper. Mary Turner and the Memory of Lynching. By Julie Buckner Armstrong. U of Georgia P. 2011. xii + 255 pp. $69.95 cloth. $24.95 paper. More than fifteen years have passed since the 1997 publication of Joel Williamson's "Wounds Not Scars: Lynching, the National Conscience, and the American Historian." In this controversial essay, Williamson confessed to readers of the Journal of American History that he "learned about white people massively lynching black people only as a scholar in the middle years of the 1960s," and "learned about it by accident" while he was "looking for something else": the origins of segregation. According to Williamson, "Nothing in my living experience as a southerner and an American, nothing in my training and practice as an historian and a professor, had prepared me for this." Much has changed in the fifty years since one of the South's leading historians stumbled upon lynching by accident. Seminal works by Jacqueline Dowd Hall, Trudier Harris, Fitzhugh Brundage, James Allen, and Jacqueline Goldbsy

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 13, 2013

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