Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Correspondences and Inspirations: The Hurston-Rawlings and Welty-Maxwell Friendships

Correspondences and Inspirations: The Hurston-Rawlings and Welty-Maxwell Friendships Correspondences and Inspirations: The Hurston- Rawlings and Welty- Maxwell Friendships by Julia Eichelberger Crossing the Creek: The Literary Friendship of Zora Neale Hurston and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. By Anna Lillios. Gainesville: UP of Florida, 2010. Hardcover, 208 pp. $29.95 cloth. What There Is To Say We Have Said: The Correspondence of Eudora Welty and William Maxwell. Ed. Suzanne Marrs. Houghton Mifflin, 2011. 512 pp. $ 35.00 cloth. According to Anna Lillios’s recent book, the literary friend- ship between Zora Neale Hurston and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings was limited by the writers’ insecurities and the anxieties of their era. Su- zanne Marrs proposes that the correspondence between Eudora Welty and William Maxwell reveals an idyllic friendship marked by generos- ity and large- mindedness, characteristics Marrs argues we can also find in their art. Lillios, who teaches at the University of Central Florida, convincingly argues that Hurston and Rawlings had more in common than read- ers might assume. Both women wrote about Florida communities and cultures that were closely tied to the land, informed by place, and rich The Southern Literary Journal, volume xlv , number 1, fall 2012 © 2012 by The Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Correspondences and Inspirations: The Hurston-Rawlings and Welty-Maxwell Friendships

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 45 (1) – Jul 19, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/correspondences-and-inspirations-the-hurston-rawlings-and-welty-yfVsQlGTgX
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 The Southern Literary Journaland the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English and Comparative Literature.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

Correspondences and Inspirations: The Hurston- Rawlings and Welty- Maxwell Friendships by Julia Eichelberger Crossing the Creek: The Literary Friendship of Zora Neale Hurston and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. By Anna Lillios. Gainesville: UP of Florida, 2010. Hardcover, 208 pp. $29.95 cloth. What There Is To Say We Have Said: The Correspondence of Eudora Welty and William Maxwell. Ed. Suzanne Marrs. Houghton Mifflin, 2011. 512 pp. $ 35.00 cloth. According to Anna Lillios’s recent book, the literary friend- ship between Zora Neale Hurston and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings was limited by the writers’ insecurities and the anxieties of their era. Su- zanne Marrs proposes that the correspondence between Eudora Welty and William Maxwell reveals an idyllic friendship marked by generos- ity and large- mindedness, characteristics Marrs argues we can also find in their art. Lillios, who teaches at the University of Central Florida, convincingly argues that Hurston and Rawlings had more in common than read- ers might assume. Both women wrote about Florida communities and cultures that were closely tied to the land, informed by place, and rich The Southern Literary Journal, volume xlv , number 1, fall 2012 © 2012 by The Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 19, 2013

There are no references for this article.