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Contextualizing African American Characters in Glasgow's The Battle-Ground

Contextualizing African American Characters in Glasgow's The Battle-Ground Contextualizing African American Characters in Glasgow's The Battle -Ground by Susan P. Wright The Battle-Ground, published in 1902, was Ellen Glasgow's fourth novel, but only the second of her seven novels chronicling the social history of Virginia. It is a novel that divides naturally into two parts, the first detailing the lives of two antebellum families of the planter aristocracy: the Lightfoots, owners of Chericoke plantation, and the Amblers, owners of the nearby Uplands plantation. The second half of the work follows Dan Montjoy, grandson of the Lightfoots and heir to Chericoke, through his experiences as an infantryman in the Civil War, but is punctuated by brief narrative returns to Chericoke and Uplands focusing mostly on the character development of Betty Ambler, younger daughter of Peyton and Julia Ambler. At core, The Battle-Ground is a bildungsroman: in the novel Betty Ambler and Dan Montjoy are both initiated into adulthood during a crucial period in United States history, beginning with the late antebellum period, continuing through the Civil War, and ending immediately after the South's surrender. At the same time, Glasgow portrays the South itself, specifically Virginia, the battleground alluded to in the novel's title, experiencing pronounced growing pains http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Contextualizing African American Characters in Glasgow's The Battle-Ground

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 39 (2) – Jul 23, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
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Abstract

Contextualizing African American Characters in Glasgow's The Battle -Ground by Susan P. Wright The Battle-Ground, published in 1902, was Ellen Glasgow's fourth novel, but only the second of her seven novels chronicling the social history of Virginia. It is a novel that divides naturally into two parts, the first detailing the lives of two antebellum families of the planter aristocracy: the Lightfoots, owners of Chericoke plantation, and the Amblers, owners of the nearby Uplands plantation. The second half of the work follows Dan Montjoy, grandson of the Lightfoots and heir to Chericoke, through his experiences as an infantryman in the Civil War, but is punctuated by brief narrative returns to Chericoke and Uplands focusing mostly on the character development of Betty Ambler, younger daughter of Peyton and Julia Ambler. At core, The Battle-Ground is a bildungsroman: in the novel Betty Ambler and Dan Montjoy are both initiated into adulthood during a crucial period in United States history, beginning with the late antebellum period, continuing through the Civil War, and ending immediately after the South's surrender. At the same time, Glasgow portrays the South itself, specifically Virginia, the battleground alluded to in the novel's title, experiencing pronounced growing pains

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 23, 2007

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