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Comparative Scholarship / Worldly Teaching

Comparative Scholarship / Worldly Teaching j ohn Burt Fo Ster Early in our careers, I suspect, many comparatists have had to ask, “What are we supposed to teach?” For me this issue r fi st surfaced during a job interview with a university that was building comparative literature by piggy- backing new hires partly in established departments and partly in the new program. Somehow, in the confused weeks before the mla , I learned that I was to interview with English but not that I should also do so with Russian. So there I was, just one step past graduate school (where we were able to move quite freely among the languages, philosophy, and history) and already entangled in the uncertainties concerning where I be- longed, at least in the university’s day- to- day role as a teaching institution. Does this story strike a chord? In my case, I soon found that unlike my re- search in French, German, and Russian, the two- ftfih s of me assigned to compara- tive teaching had to rely largely on translations. i Th s situation even prevailed at an overseas campus in France, where students on a junior- year study abroad were generally taking third- year language http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Comparative Scholarship / Worldly Teaching

The Comparatist , Volume 34 – Jun 24, 2010

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

j ohn Burt Fo Ster Early in our careers, I suspect, many comparatists have had to ask, “What are we supposed to teach?” For me this issue r fi st surfaced during a job interview with a university that was building comparative literature by piggy- backing new hires partly in established departments and partly in the new program. Somehow, in the confused weeks before the mla , I learned that I was to interview with English but not that I should also do so with Russian. So there I was, just one step past graduate school (where we were able to move quite freely among the languages, philosophy, and history) and already entangled in the uncertainties concerning where I be- longed, at least in the university’s day- to- day role as a teaching institution. Does this story strike a chord? In my case, I soon found that unlike my re- search in French, German, and Russian, the two- ftfih s of me assigned to compara- tive teaching had to rely largely on translations. i Th s situation even prevailed at an overseas campus in France, where students on a junior- year study abroad were generally taking third- year language

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 24, 2010

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