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Comparative Literature: Where We Started and What We Have Become

Comparative Literature: Where We Started and What We Have Become Dorothy M. Figueira Comparative Literature Where We Started and What We Have Become I would r fi st like to thank the conference organizers and Kathy Komar for allowing colleagues to address you today. Many of you may be unaware that me and my i Cl a it was the a Cl a that contributed to the establishment of the i Cl a some ftfiy years ago. We in the International Association owe much to our American colleagues. It was, therefore, a great honor to convene this forum at your annual meeting. I would like to preface this discussion with some anecdotal background thoughts on the state of the discipline of Comparative Literature before I turn the podium over to my colleagues who have come to discuss with you the state of Comparative Litera- ture in their respective countries. I came to the study of Comparative Literature very late in my student career, ae ft r considerable graduate work in theology and classical religions. I was able to segue into a new discipline because I had good linguistic training as an historian of religions. e Th se were the days when one studied languages by studying literature (there was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Comparative Literature: Where We Started and What We Have Become

The Comparatist , Volume 32 – May 24, 2008

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Dorothy M. Figueira Comparative Literature Where We Started and What We Have Become I would r fi st like to thank the conference organizers and Kathy Komar for allowing colleagues to address you today. Many of you may be unaware that me and my i Cl a it was the a Cl a that contributed to the establishment of the i Cl a some ftfiy years ago. We in the International Association owe much to our American colleagues. It was, therefore, a great honor to convene this forum at your annual meeting. I would like to preface this discussion with some anecdotal background thoughts on the state of the discipline of Comparative Literature before I turn the podium over to my colleagues who have come to discuss with you the state of Comparative Litera- ture in their respective countries. I came to the study of Comparative Literature very late in my student career, ae ft r considerable graduate work in theology and classical religions. I was able to segue into a new discipline because I had good linguistic training as an historian of religions. e Th se were the days when one studied languages by studying literature (there was

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 24, 2008

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