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Civil War Infantry Tactics: Training, Combat, and Small-Unit Effectiveness by Earl J. Hess (review)

Civil War Infantry Tactics: Training, Combat, and Small-Unit Effectiveness by Earl J. Hess (review) those containing Davis’s entries for each year of the diaries allow read- ers to become acquainted with black Philadelphia. Davis’s words become more than simple daily notations as Whitehead guides her readers through the sometimes murky terrain of race, class, and color on the eve of the Civil War. After reading Notes from a Colored Girl, not only do readers feel as if they know Emilie Davis, but they also understand the church world and the educational institutions that she attended. Readers have a bet- ter understanding of the kinds of labor that free black women performed, with its hurdles and its benefits. While the bibliography could have been a bit more extensive, surrounding newer scholarship on African American women’s lives, Whitehead astutely points out that Davis “does not com- pletely fit into the neatly defined historical categories that currently exist for nineteenth-century black American women” (14). Both of these edited volumes leave the reader wanting more. We want to know more about Emilie Davis and the world she inhabited as national emancipation made its way to the United States. These fine vol - umes remind scholars that history lives in attics, basements, and in private collections. We must http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Civil War Infantry Tactics: Training, Combat, and Small-Unit Effectiveness by Earl J. Hess (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

those containing Davis’s entries for each year of the diaries allow read- ers to become acquainted with black Philadelphia. Davis’s words become more than simple daily notations as Whitehead guides her readers through the sometimes murky terrain of race, class, and color on the eve of the Civil War. After reading Notes from a Colored Girl, not only do readers feel as if they know Emilie Davis, but they also understand the church world and the educational institutions that she attended. Readers have a bet- ter understanding of the kinds of labor that free black women performed, with its hurdles and its benefits. While the bibliography could have been a bit more extensive, surrounding newer scholarship on African American women’s lives, Whitehead astutely points out that Davis “does not com- pletely fit into the neatly defined historical categories that currently exist for nineteenth-century black American women” (14). Both of these edited volumes leave the reader wanting more. We want to know more about Emilie Davis and the world she inhabited as national emancipation made its way to the United States. These fine vol - umes remind scholars that history lives in attics, basements, and in private collections. We must

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 12, 2016

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