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Building the Worlds of Our Dreams: Black Girlhood and Quare Narratives in African American Literature

Building the Worlds of Our Dreams: Black Girlhood and Quare Narratives in African American... J an a K a BoW man l e W i S b u I l DI n G the w orl D s of o ur Dre ams: b l ac K G I rlhoo D an D Quare n arr at I ves I n a fr I c an a mer I c an lI ter ature On the one hand, my grandmother uses “quare” to denotesomethi ng or someone who is odd, irregular, or slightly off-kilter— “More than sur- definitions in keeping withtraditional un - vival” . . . looks derstandings and uses of “queer.” On the other hand, she also deploys “quare” to like dreaming connotesomethi ngex cessive—something thatmight philosophicallytransl atei nto along with and an excess of discursive and epistemologi - beyond the cal meanings grounded in AfricanAmeri - can cultural rituals and lived experience. circumstances —E. Patrick Johnson, “‘Quare’ Studies, or (Almost) Everything I Know about Queer of our children Studies I Learned from My Grandmother” and specifi - cally our girls Black girlhood is inherently q uare. It is, as E. Patrick whose notions Johnson argues, “something excessive” because it extends beyond the foundationsof Black cultural of freedom on experiences.It is to physicallyi http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Building the Worlds of Our Dreams: Black Girlhood and Quare Narratives in African American Literature

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 51 (1) – Dec 9, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English.
ISSN
1534-1461

Abstract

J an a K a BoW man l e W i S b u I l DI n G the w orl D s of o ur Dre ams: b l ac K G I rlhoo D an D Quare n arr at I ves I n a fr I c an a mer I c an lI ter ature On the one hand, my grandmother uses “quare” to denotesomethi ng or someone who is odd, irregular, or slightly off-kilter— “More than sur- definitions in keeping withtraditional un - vival” . . . looks derstandings and uses of “queer.” On the other hand, she also deploys “quare” to like dreaming connotesomethi ngex cessive—something thatmight philosophicallytransl atei nto along with and an excess of discursive and epistemologi - beyond the cal meanings grounded in AfricanAmeri - can cultural rituals and lived experience. circumstances —E. Patrick Johnson, “‘Quare’ Studies, or (Almost) Everything I Know about Queer of our children Studies I Learned from My Grandmother” and specifi - cally our girls Black girlhood is inherently q uare. It is, as E. Patrick whose notions Johnson argues, “something excessive” because it extends beyond the foundationsof Black cultural of freedom on experiences.It is to physicallyi

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 9, 2019

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