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Boxing Yoknapatawpha: Faulkner, Race, and Popular Front Boxing Narratives

Boxing Yoknapatawpha: Faulkner, Race, and Popular Front Boxing Narratives Boxing Yoknapatawpha: Faulkner, Race, and Popular Front Boxing Narratives by Grant Bain One powerful and productive trend in recent Faulkner scholarship has been to situate "Count No Count" within the popular culture of the 1930s and early 1940s, examining his appropriation of its themes and narrative tactics. John T. Matthews has demonstrated, for example, how Faulkner both used and challenged Hollywood formulas in his script writing, and how he exported his experiences as a screenwriter to his fiction, as in the story "Artist at Home." 1 Read under this light, novels like Sanctuary (1931) and Intruder in the Dust (1948) clearly borrow from the popular genres of detective novels and noir film, unsurprising in light of Faulkner's time in Hollywood and his friendship with detective novelist Dashiell Hammett. Such scholarship so far has not recognized Faulkner's use of yet another highly popular trend -- the boxing narrative. While Faulkner never wrote a boxing story nor prominently featured boxers in his fiction, much of his best known work deftly and subtly borrows from the boxing narratives well known to naturalist writers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and to Popular Front writers of the 1930s. Exploring the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Southern Literary Journal University of North Carolina Press

Boxing Yoknapatawpha: Faulkner, Race, and Popular Front Boxing Narratives

The Southern Literary Journal , Volume 46 (1) – Feb 13, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Literary Journal and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of English .
ISSN
1534-1461
Publisher site
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Abstract

Boxing Yoknapatawpha: Faulkner, Race, and Popular Front Boxing Narratives by Grant Bain One powerful and productive trend in recent Faulkner scholarship has been to situate "Count No Count" within the popular culture of the 1930s and early 1940s, examining his appropriation of its themes and narrative tactics. John T. Matthews has demonstrated, for example, how Faulkner both used and challenged Hollywood formulas in his script writing, and how he exported his experiences as a screenwriter to his fiction, as in the story "Artist at Home." 1 Read under this light, novels like Sanctuary (1931) and Intruder in the Dust (1948) clearly borrow from the popular genres of detective novels and noir film, unsurprising in light of Faulkner's time in Hollywood and his friendship with detective novelist Dashiell Hammett. Such scholarship so far has not recognized Faulkner's use of yet another highly popular trend -- the boxing narrative. While Faulkner never wrote a boxing story nor prominently featured boxers in his fiction, much of his best known work deftly and subtly borrows from the boxing narratives well known to naturalist writers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and to Popular Front writers of the 1930s. Exploring the

Journal

The Southern Literary JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 13, 2013

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