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Biblia America, Vol. 2: Exodus–Deuteronomy ed. by Cotton Mather (review)

Biblia America, Vol. 2: Exodus–Deuteronomy ed. by Cotton Mather (review) Resources for Early American Studies { 323 context that he witnessed but also helped to forge, Juan Bautista’s life story seems to have contributed to a Creole (Spanish American) redefinition of his brother José Gabriel’s 1780 uprising as a first step toward independence from Spanish tyranny (in truth, it was hardly that). Similarly, Juan B - autis ta’s memoirs effectively recast his sufferings and the cruelty of his captors, which many in Peru and Spain saw as just punishment for his unspeakable crimes against God and King, as an irrefutable proof of his unwavering loyalty toward an Americano cause, an ordeal that, rather than being the source of indelible shame, merited praise and reward. This cause had now been embraced with patriotic fervor by the Latin American (mostly white) elites who agreed to Juan Bautista’s request for a pension in Buenos Aires in exchange of his writing the account he had presented to substantiate his claims “in his own handwriting.” In that sense, students might not help but wonder whether Juan Bautista was merely a witness or, in fact, the inext - ri cable nexus between an era and its own political reinvention. jOsé carlOs de la pUenTe Texas State http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Literature University of North Carolina Press

Biblia America, Vol. 2: Exodus–Deuteronomy ed. by Cotton Mather (review)

Early American Literature , Volume 57 (1) – Feb 4, 2022

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-147X

Abstract

Resources for Early American Studies { 323 context that he witnessed but also helped to forge, Juan Bautista’s life story seems to have contributed to a Creole (Spanish American) redefinition of his brother José Gabriel’s 1780 uprising as a first step toward independence from Spanish tyranny (in truth, it was hardly that). Similarly, Juan B - autis ta’s memoirs effectively recast his sufferings and the cruelty of his captors, which many in Peru and Spain saw as just punishment for his unspeakable crimes against God and King, as an irrefutable proof of his unwavering loyalty toward an Americano cause, an ordeal that, rather than being the source of indelible shame, merited praise and reward. This cause had now been embraced with patriotic fervor by the Latin American (mostly white) elites who agreed to Juan Bautista’s request for a pension in Buenos Aires in exchange of his writing the account he had presented to substantiate his claims “in his own handwriting.” In that sense, students might not help but wonder whether Juan Bautista was merely a witness or, in fact, the inext - ri cable nexus between an era and its own political reinvention. jOsé carlOs de la pUenTe Texas State

Journal

Early American LiteratureUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 4, 2022

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